Caribbean marine protected areas project: the role of marine protected areas in fisheries management and biodiversity conservation in coral reef ecosystems: final technical report to the United Kingdom Department for International Development

The purpose of this project has been to address the issue of decreased catch rates and declining income per unit of fishing effort in Jamaica's artisanal fisheries. This is an issue that is not unique to Jamaica. It is faced by fishers in most of the countries surrounding the Caribbean. The absence of any significant fisheries management, combined with excessive population densities and a lack of employment opportunities, has led to increasing fishing effort in Caribbean coastal fisheries, resulting in recruitment and growth overfishing.

Assessment, management and future directions for coastal fisheries in Asian countries

In Asia, the fisheries sector is important in terms of food security, livelihoods and foreign exchange earnings. However, as in many parts of the world, there are signs that capture fisheries are fully exploited or overfished. Management of fisheries in the region is often hampered by lack of information on the status of fisheries in terms of biological, social, economic, policy and governance aspects. This regional project documents an alarming decline on coastal fishery resources, based on historic research surveys in South and Southeast Asia.

Social equity and benefits as the nexus of a transformative Blue Economy: A sectoral review of implications

The term ‘Blue Economy’ is increasingly used in various marine sectors and development frameworks. For it to be a truly useful approach, however, we argue that social benefits and equity must be explicitly prioritized alongside environmental and economic concerns. This integration of social dimensions within the Blue Economy is required to ensure that marine economic sectors contribute to achieving sustainable development goals.

Inclusive ecosystems? Women's participation in the aquatic ecosystem of Lake Malawi

Ecosystem services and their role in alleviating poverty are centered on a set of gendered social relations. The understanding of these relations between men and women in aquatic ecosystems can unveil gender-based opportunities and constraints along the value chains of the ecosystem services. A gender discourse perspective on participation of actors of an ecosystem can further facilitate the understanding of the complex and subtle ways in which gender is represented, constructed, and contested. This paper analyses the barriers to the participation of women in the fishing industry.

Aquatic habitats in the Ayeyarwady Basin and their biodiversity

This document provides a description of the general freshwater habitats found throughout the Ayeyarwady Basin. With a wide range of riverine and wetland habitats and high levels of species biodiversity, the Ayeyarwady River remains an ecologically important area and one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. However, the habitats of the Ayeyarwady River, from the mountain’s rivers in the Eastern Himalayas to the Outer Delta Islands, are increasingly being subjected to intense and growing pressure from habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, and over-exploitation of natural resources.

Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

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