Impacts of epizootic ulcerative syndrome on subsistence fisheries and wildlife

Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), caused by the water mould (Oomycota) Aphanomyces invadans, has spread throughout the world’s major continents over the last 50 years, with the apparent exception of South and Central America. With over 160 susceptible fish species representing 54 families and 16 orders recorded to date, EUS is of international concern and infection with A. invadans is a World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed disease.

Indonesian aquaculture futures: identifying interventions for reducing environmental impacts

Indonesia is the world's second largest producer and third largest consumer of seafood. Fish is thus essential to the nation, both financially and nutritionally. Overfishing and the effects of climate change will, however, limit future capture fisheries landings, so any increases in future seafood production will need to come from aquaculture. Aquaculture's ecological effects are dependent upon the choice of species, management, and where it is sited.

Characterizing fish supply and aquaculture systems in Myanmar as a guide to measuring environmental footprints

Aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the world and an attractive option for improving livelihood security, especially in developing countries. Yet as aquaculture assumes greater significance as a means to meet global food and nutrition demands, concerns about the environmental impacts of aquaculture systems are on the rise.

Indonesian aquaculture futures: Evaluating environmental and socioeconomic potentials and limitations

Indonesia is the world's second largest seafood producer, but capture fisheries landings have slowed down over the last decade. In response, the Indonesian government has also set ambitious targets for expanding the aquaculture sector up to 2030. The present research therefore quantifies environmental impacts using life cycle assessments (LCAs), and some socioeconomic indicators, for six alternative scenarios projecting the growth of Indonesia's aquaculture up to 2030 by Tran et al. (2017).

Ex-ante assessment of integrated aquaculture-agriculture adoption and impact in Southern Malawi

There are increasing requirements for impact assessment by development partners in order to increase the accountability and effectiveness of research and development projects. Impact assessment research has been dominated by conventional economic methods. This context challenges agricultural research organizations to develop and apply alternative impact assessment methods incorporating economic, social, and environmental impact components.

Review of environmental impact, site selection and carrying capacity estimation for small scale aquaculture in Asia

Asia is the leading aquaculture region in the world, contributing to 85% of total world aquaculture production. Of the top 10 aquaculture producing countries 9 are Asian with China accounting for more than 65% of Asian production. Aquaculture in Asia contribute more than 80% of an estimated 17-20 million aquaculture farmers in Asia providing livelihoods, food security and export earning power but at the same time there are growing problems with environmental impact from large numbers of small-scale producers and the difficulties in planning and management of further development.

Training in fisheries planning and management: the case of the Southern African Development Community nations.

This paper presents an evaluation of the 15-week course on Training in Fisheries Planning and Management being offered at the University of Namibia since 1991. This course includes instruction in fisheries technology, fisheries biology, fisheries law and law of the sea, fisheries economics, fisheries sociology, environment impact assessment, planning and management, the logical framework approach to planning and computer literacy. The participats in the course have rated the various elements in a range of 2.9 to 4.7 out of a maximum of 5 points.

The introduction of exotic fish in Sri Lanka with special reference to tilapia.

Introductions of exotic finfish between 1948 and 1953 are reported in this paper, with a brief reference to earlier and later introductions. Exotic fish were introduced principally to develop the potential for aquaculture in fresh and brackish waters in order to increase the availability of fish for rural communities through the biological control of aquatic vegetation. The algal feeding tilapia (Sarotherodon mossambicus) has created a new food industry in inland and brackishwaters.

Influence of built structures on local livelihoods: case studies of road development, irrigation and fishing lots

This report documents the results from an assessment of the influence of built structures on the livelihoods of Tonle Sap communities, as part of the livelihoods component of the “Study of the Influence of Built Structures on the Fisheries of the Tonle Sap”.

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