Governance of global value chains in response to food safety and certification standards: The Case of shrimp from Vietnam

We use global value chain (GVC) theory to understand governance of Vietnam’s shrimp farming industry. We describe this GVC as buyer-driven with important food safety standards imposed by governments of importing countries and new certification systems promoted by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Governance relations are clear between governments in importing countries and Vietnam, and between importers and NGOs. Governance relations become more fragmented further down the chain where large numbers of small-scale producers and traders operate.

Smallholder farmers in Malawi adopt and improve technologies from collaborative research

Details are given of the various new technologies demonstrated by ICLARM and the Fisheries Department in Malawito smallholder farmers, which include the following: 1) Use of Pennisetum purpureum as an alternative/supplement to maize bran as fish feed; (2) Creation of high quality compost from poor quality plant wastes as fish food or fertilizer; 3) Vegetable-pond integration using pond sediments and water for adjacent vegetable beds; 4) Integration of chicken and fish enterprises; 5) Pond stirring with a bamboo rake for lifting nutrients from the pond bottom into the water column; 6) Use of

Production performance of white fish in two different culture systems in Patuakhali, Bangladesh

The present study was carried out to compare the production performance of white fish from traditional and modified traditional culture system in Patuakhali with the following objectives: 1) To know the production performance in traditional and modified traditional culture systems. 2) To observe the economic feasibility of two culture methods 3) To find out the effect of stocking density on survival and production in different culture system. 4) To know the socio-economic status of the fish farmers involved in both culture system.

Small-scale aquaculture: Global and national perspectives

Fish has been a staple food for over a billion people. Its demand is increasing due to growing population and awareness about health benefits of aquatic animal food. Disappointingly, wild catch worldwide is on the decline and aquaculture is emerging as the only solution. It grew at 9%/yr in the last 10 years becoming the fastest growing food production sector. At present, aquaculture produces only about 45 million t per year but it needs to be doubled by 2030 to meet its growing demand. Asia produces over 85% of the global farmed fish - mostly by small-scale farmers.

Farmers' attitudes in Malawi to the use of excreta in fish farming

The findings are presented of a survey conducted in Malawi to determine the acceptability by fish farmers of raisingfish in excreta-fed ponds. The use of livestock excreta appeared to be acceptable to the majority of farmers, whereas the use of human excreta was not. Various recommendations are made regarding the promotion of the use of excreta in small-holder farms.

Utilizing different aquatic resources for livelihoods in Asia: a resource book.

The search for sustainable livelihood approaches to reduce poverty continues to pose a challenge to rural development planners and practitioners. Many fishers and farmers have developed methods of aquaculture that use water-based, natural-capital stocks and which utilize resources available locally. Development agencies have undertaken research and development efforts that build on these initiatives. This resource book is a compilation of 67 field-derived experiences and methods applied in Asia. These were compiled from contributions by 37 practitioners from 12 countries.

Decentralised Nile tilapia seed production

Local production of mixed sex Nile tilapia in irrigated rice fields has been introduced, established and then spread through farmer-to farmer contact in Northwest Bangladesh benefiting poor households in a number of ways. Food fish farmers have improved access to high quality seed at the time of peak demand early in the monsoon season. The seed producers benefit through small but strategic cash flows but also improved production of their fish for their own consumption, both as large fingerlings and fish after further grow on.

Development of sustainable aquaculture project: progress report (1 January 2002 - 31 March 2002)

The Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) was authorized by USAID under the Cooperative Agreement # 388-A-00-00-00068-00 on 28 June 2000. This report covers activities for the three months of the project, 1 January 2002 through 31 March 2002. Financial reporting for the Project is handled separately from ICLARM headquarters in Penang, Malaysia.

Report on associate partner NGO foundation training course: (for staff recruited in 2002)

Freshwater Resources Research Program of the WorldFish Center is aimed at improving food security and eradicating poverty by introducing small-scale fresh water aquaculture as an element into the economic activities of resource poor households in rural area (Bangladesh). The target groups are the poor producers and consumers who can benefit from the better use and management of aquatic resources. Year 2000 was the beginning of the USAID funded Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP).

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