Report on associate partner NGO foundation training course: (for staff recruited in 2002)

Freshwater Resources Research Program of the WorldFish Center is aimed at improving food security and eradicating poverty by introducing small-scale fresh water aquaculture as an element into the economic activities of resource poor households in rural area (Bangladesh). The target groups are the poor producers and consumers who can benefit from the better use and management of aquatic resources. Year 2000 was the beginning of the USAID funded Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP).

Development of sustainable aquaculture project: progress report (1 October 2002 - 31 December 2002)

The main thrust of the Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project is to sponsor on-farm aquaculture production demonstrations implemented through co-operating NGO partners. These demonstrations are expected to show farmers and their neighbors the profitability of managed aquaculture systems as small business operations. Both small ponds and integrated rice and fish systems, based on research proven production results, are the target of these demonstrations.

Aquaculture extension impacts in Bangladesh: a case study from Kapasia, Gazipur

With many ponds and high demand for fish, Bangladesh has a high potential for aquaculture . Since the 1980s, there have been many aquaculture extension projects. As a result, pond aquaculture production is estimated to have trebled between approximately 1990 and 2000, and is currently estimated to be in order of 750 000 t per year. This gave an ideal opportunity to understand the impacts of aquaculture extension.

Development of sustainable aquaculture project: progress report (1 April 2001 - 30 June 2001)

The main thrust of the DSAP is to sponsor on-farm aquaculture production demonstrations implemented through cooperating NGO partners. These demonstrations are expected to show farmers and their neighbors the profitability of managed aquaculture systems as small business operations. Both small ponds and integrated rice and fish systems, based on research proven production results, are the target of these demonstrations. The Project also has a research component directed to understanding and exploring additional production options and improving the technology transfer process.

Status of the Mekong Delta: agricultural development, environmental pollution and farmer differentiation

More than half of the 4 million hectares of the Mekong Delta are covered by acid sulfate soils (ASS). Most ASS areas have been reclaimed for agricultural production during recent decades by means of new canals, new settlements, floodplain drainage, and new rice varieties and cropping systems. In 1996, agriculture occupied 83% of the total area of the Delta. Urban areas account for 10% of the total area. This leaves only 7% for natural or semi-natural wetlands. Rice is the dominant agricultural product and greatly contributes to the food security of the country.

Fishponds in farming systems

This book is a collection of refereed papers on a controversial subject in agricultural development. Arguing that sustainability of fish culture in ponds needs a new paradigm - feed the pond to grow fish - two chapters focus on nutrient cycling in such systems. Another chapter makes the case for breeding Nile tilapia for resource poor farmers and presents practical options to avoid the pitfalls that arise from natural tilapia mating in low-input ponds.

Rice research, technological progress, and poverty: the Bangladesh case

This case study assesses the impact on poverty of the technological changes in rice cultivation made by IRRI and its national partners in Bangladesh. Modern varieties (MVs) with higher yield potential were first introduced more than 20 years ago, and 47 varieties have since been released for different agroecological conditions. Because of the importance of rice and the increases in both yield and labour requirements of MVs, agricultural research has had both direct effects on adopting farmers and indirect effects on employment and prices.

Consultation on fish genetic resources.

Naturally occurring fish genetic resources are of great importance for fisheries and aquaculture. Fish farmers and fishers face a future in which the diversity of their basic resources is under threat and the genetic composition of these resources will be increasingly reliant on human protection and manipulation. Fish genetic resources research, information and training in the context of existing and future activities are discussed.

Development of sustainable aquaculture project: progress report (1 July 2002 - 30 September 2002)

The Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) was authorized by USAID under the Cooperative Agreement # 388-A-00-00-00068-00 on 28 June 2000. This report covers activities for the three months of the project, 1 January 2002 through 31 March 2002. Financial reporting for the Project is handled separately from ICLARM headquarters in Penang, Malaysia.

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