Integrated farming: a new approach in the Basse Casamance, Sénégal.

Environmental changes due to 2 decades of drought have modified the ecosystem of the Basse Casamance, Senegal thus forcing farmers to change their practices. They have built fish ponds and diversified into crops such as peanut, millet, sorghum, cassava and vegetables. The ponds have 2 purposes - to protect ricefields against inflow of brackishwater and to raise fish. The fish complements rice, which is the main diet, adding animal protein and serving as a source of income.

Inland community fisheries in southern Laos

Since 1993, a series of aquatic resource co-management workshops have been on-going, established by the Lao government and fisheries agencies for village farmers in the Khong District in southern Laos, aiming for a sustainable use of inland capture fisheries resources. This article describes the mechanics involved and the participants' perspective, as well as reporting the outcomes and progress of the workshops so far.

The incidence of suspected white spot syndrome virus in semi-intensive and extensive shrimp farms in Bangladesh: implications for management

The study was conducted to assess key factors influencing suspected white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) disease and associated shrimp production and economic performance in three contrasting black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) culture technologies promoted by the United States Agency for International Development funded Shrimp Quality Support Project (SQSP) in Bangladesh.

Improving the productivity of the rice-shrimp system in the South-west coastal region of Bangladesh

The production of wet-season rice followed by dry-season shrimp (Penaeus monodon) is a common farming system in the south-western coastal region of Bangladesh. This chapter summarizes the experiments conducted in the farmers' fields during the rice- and shrimp-growing seasons of 2004, 2005 and 2006, with the aim of improving the total farm productivity of the rice-shrimp system through technological intervention.

Improving disease resistance of cultured fish through selective programs (an overview)

The sustainable development of aquaculture in Egypt needs the efforts coordinated of different sectors. Disease prevention is the most important aspect for protecting the success in the field of aquaculture. Egyptian farmers, like other farmers in other countries, use different chemicals and antibiotics to treat fish diseases. This approach is dangerous to aquaculture because of the residue in fish body and also for the development of drug resistant bacteria that not only affect fish but also induce harmful effect on humans and may have a deteriorative effect on the environment.

Improvement of traditional shrimp culture in the Mekong Delta.

Improvements to traditional brackishwater shrimp culture in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam are discussed. A technical support program has been implemented based on a so-called improved extensive shrimp culture method, as previously developed and tested by the Artermia and Shrimp Research and Development Center (ASRDC). The program focuses on: 1) the use of hatchery-produced postlarvae (of Penaeus monodon and P. merguinensis) nursed for three to four weeks, and 2) the application of low-cost pond management practices including predator control, supplementary feeding and frequent water renewal.

Impacts of aquaculture development projects in Western Cameroon

To measure the impact of past projects on the sustained adoption and development of aquaculture, and to assess the potential for future growth, a participatory rural appraisal (PRA) based on the Research Tool for Natural Resource Management, Monitoring and Evaluation (RESTORE) of 100 farmers (62 with fishponds, 38 without) was undertaken between January and August 2001 in the Noun Division of Western Province, Cameroon. The average household of 14 persons possessed 5.5 ha of land. Educational level is low (less then 35% above primary, 24% illiterate).

The impact of integrated aquaculture-agriculture on small-scale farms in Southern Malawi

Sustainable agricultural intensification is an urgent challenge for Sub-Saharan Africa. One potential solution is to rely on local farmers’ knowledge for improved management of diverse on-farm resources and integration among various farm enterprises. In this article, we analyze the farm-level impact of one recent example, namely the integrated aquaculture–agriculture (IAA) technologies that have been developed and disseminated in a participatory manner in Malawi.

The impact of integrated aquaculture agriculture on small-scale farm sustainability and farmers’ livelihoods: experience from Bangladesh

Intensification of agriculture often requires external inputs, has negative environmental effects and increases risk, especially for small-scale producers. Integrated aquaculture-agriculture (IAA) instead uses on-farm synergy effects of crop and fish production. The impact of long-term IAA training provided to small-scale farmers in Bangladesh is assessed using panel data from 260 project and 126 control farmers who were monitored from 2002/2003 to 2005/2006.

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