Investment Appraisal of Genetic Improvement Programs in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus)

The economic benefit derived from a genetic improvement program with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was examined from a national perspective. An industry structure was assumed whereby the genetic improvement program is conducted in a nucleus which provides brood stock to hatcheries, which in turn produce fry for farmers to grow out to market size. Discounting was used to express all returns and costs in terms of net present value. The economic benefit (discounted returns minus discounted costs, EB) and the benefit/cost ratio (BCR) were studied for a 10 year time horizon.

Integration of aquaculture into the farming systems of the floodprone ecosystems of Bangladesh: an evaluation of adoption and impact.

This report presents the results of studies undertaken for incorporating low-external input aquaculture practices into the farming systems of a complex floodprone ecosystem in Bangladesh and the impacts of integration on income, nutrition and resource use in rural households. The study shows that multi-purpose ponds which were underutilized or unutilized because of risk of flooding could be made productive through proper management and incorporation into the existing farming systems.

Freshwater fish seed resources and supply: Africa regional synthesis

The availability and quality of fingerlings for stocking in aquaculture ponds have repeatedly been identified as a key constraint to the development of aquaculture in Africa. Government hatcheries have generally failed to achieve sustainability and the private sector is impeded by the lack of marketing information and appropriate technological assistance. At present, the main aquaculture species in the continent are Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and the African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

Factors influencing cultivation of the Lilongwe and Linthipe River Banks ni Malawi: a case study of Salima District

The study was conducted to investigate factors that influence farmers to cultivate along the river banks in Salima District, in the Central Region of Malawi. Using logit analysis the study revealed that household size, main occupation, education market availability and land holding size were important parameters in influencing the farmers to engage in river bank cultivation. Basing on these results it has therefore been suggested that since these farmers cultivate along the river banks without conserving the soils, a livelihood approach must be adopted.

Estimation of genetic change in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by comparing contemporary progeny produced by males born in 1991 or in 2003

Genetic change in the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was estimated by comparing the performance of the progeny produced from cryopreserved spermatozoa from the base population with that produced by freshly collected spermatozoa from the ninth generation. The comparison involved artificial fertilization of 13 males from each generation (base and ninth) with a random sample of 18 female brood stock. The progeny produced went through a 120 day grow-out period, after which live weight, standard length, body depth and survival were recorded.

Development of sustainable aquaculture project: progress report (1 April 2003 - 30 June 2003)

The Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) was authorized by USAID under the Cooperative Agreement # 388-A-00-00-00068-00 on 28 June 2000. This technical progress report covers activities for the three months of the project, 1 July 2003 through 30 September 2003. The main thrust of the Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project is to sponsor on-farm aquaculture production demonstrations implemented through co-operating NGO partners.

Capacity for conservation of African aquatic biodiversity

Human and institutional capacities for developing and managing genetically improved tilapia in Africa are discussed. Discussions are related particularly to the status of hatcheries, rearing facilities, research and extension services, training in genetic enhancement, and fish transfer in major aquaculture countries in Africa. The leading aquaculture producing countries are Egypt and Nigeria along with nine other countries with some intermediate levels of fish production. The availability of quality fry and fingerlings constitutes a major constraint.

Bivalve mollusc culture research in Thailand.

An account of research, which explored new biological and socioeconomic perspectives on bivalve mollusc culture to increase production and to improve the livelihood of farmers. It presents a review of the pathways in which aquatic macrophytes may be involved in the food production process, directly as human food, as livestock fodder, as fertilizer (mulch and manure, ash, green manure, compost, biogas slurry), and as food for aquatic herbivores, such as fish, turtles, rodents and manatees.

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