Youth participation in small-scale fisheries, aquaculture and value chains in Africa and the Asia-Pacific

IWMI, a managing partner of FISH, conducted an assessment of youth participation in SSF, aquaculture and value chains between November 2017 and May 2018. The assessment was conducted in Africa and the Asia-Pacific, with a particular focus on the FISH focal countries of Egypt, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia in Africa and Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and Solomon Islands in the Asia-Pacific.

Selective breeding trait preferences for farmed tilapia among low-income women and men consumers in Egypt; Implications for pro-poor and gender-responsive fish breeding programmes

A number of studies have highlighted the promising growth of Egyptian tilapia aquaculture and the role of genetically improved strains in this development, such as the Abbassa Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, Linneaus, 1758). However, few studies have explored the link between aquaculture development and changes in fish demand among low-income consumers.

Following the fish inland: understanding fish distribution networks for rural development and nutrition security

In developing countries, small-scale fisheries are both a pivotal source of livelihood and essential for the nutritional intake of larger food insecure populations. Distribution networks that move fish from landing sites to coastal and inland consumers offer entry points to address livelihood enhancement and food security objectives of rural development initiatives. To be able to utilize fish distribution networks to address national development targets, a sound understanding of how local systems function and are organized is imperative.

Cell wall disruption increases bioavailability of Nannochloropsis gaditana nutrients for juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

In this study the correlation between the accessibility of nutrients and in vivo nutrient digestibility was tested on the marine microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana in juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). It was hypothesized that disrupting the cell walls of microalgae increases the nutrient accessibility and digestibility. N. gaditana biomass was subjected to physical treatments (pasteurization, freezing, freeze drying) or mechanical treatments (bead milling) to influence its cell wall integrity. These treatments resulted in an up to 4 x increase in in vitro accessibility of N.

Employment generation in the Egyptian aquaculture value chain: implications for meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Egypt faces multiple interlinked challenges such as unemployment, poverty and gender inequality that pose tremendous barriers in the current efforts to achieve sustainable development. Aquaculture is a primary sector of the economy that has high potential to not only for provide nutritious food, but also to contribute to the national economy. The aquaculture value chain provides substantial employment generation opportunities, including for females and the youth.

Rapid genomic detection of aquaculture

Aquaculture is the world’s fastest growing food sector increasingly and is recognized for its potential to alleviate poverty and hunger in small-scale systems. However, progress is limited by diseases and lack of knowledge and tools to identify fish pathogens, track their origin and manage their spread. Whole genome sequencing informs how pathogens change and move through environments, permitting implementation of evidence-based biosecurity to minimize disease impact. Offsite sequencing services are expensive and cause prohibitive delays.

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