Vulnerabilities in aquatic animal production

The role of aquatic animals in global food and nutrition security is increasingly recognised. The global demand for fish is increasing, leading to a need to significantly increase its supply. Securing future fish supplies through sustainable production is a challenge as major resources such as fresh water and land are becoming limited worldwide. Aquaculture and capture fisheries face various threats from both human-mediated and natural environmental change, including climate change. Aquaculture systems and practices are vulnerable to such changes.

Impacts of epizootic ulcerative syndrome on subsistence fisheries and wildlife

Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), caused by the water mould (Oomycota) Aphanomyces invadans, has spread throughout the world’s major continents over the last 50 years, with the apparent exception of South and Central America. With over 160 susceptible fish species representing 54 families and 16 orders recorded to date, EUS is of international concern and infection with A. invadans is a World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed disease.

Tilapia major clinical signs (Odia version)

The purpose of this poster is to enhance the capacity of hatcheries, nurseries, grow-out farmers and extension service providers to recognize and report tilapia diseases. Prevention, early recognition, diagnosis and rapid intervention are the best steps to manage aquatic animal diseases. If you observe clinical signs, abnormal behaviour and unusual mortality, contact your local aquaculture health professionals to report and ask for support.
 

Efficacy and safety of boric acid as a preventive treatment against Saprolegnia infection in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

Saprolegniosis is a worldwide fungal-like infection affecting freshwater fishes and their eggs. Reports show high mortalities and subsequent economic losses annually from Saprolegnia infections. Most therapeutants against Saprolegnia spp. infections are inefficient and some have negative impact on the environment. In this study, we have investigated the ability of boric acid (BA) to prevent Saprolegnia infection in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).
 

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV): Putting a global resource at risk

Tilapia lake virus is a newly emerging virus that is associated with significant mortalities in farmed tilapia. With cases reported across Africa, Asia and South America, the virus represents a huge risk to the global tilapia industry, whose 2015 production was valued at USD 9.8 billion. All countries with a tilapia industry must be vigilant and act quickly to investigate cases of mortalities in farms.

Experimental infection reveals transmission of tilapia lake virus (TiLV) from tilapia broodstock to their reproductive organs and fertilized eggs

Early developmental stages of tilapia, including fertilized eggs were tested positive for TiLV in a previous study. We, therefore, hypothesized that infected broodstock is able to pass the virus to their reproductive organs and then to the fertilized eggs. In order to prove this hypothesis, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) broodstock were experimentally infected with TiLV by intramuscular injection and non-infected broodstock were used as control group.

Tilapia major clinical signs (Khmer version)

The purpose of this poster is to enhance the capacity of hatcheries, nurseries, grow-out farmers and extension service providers to recognize and report tilapia diseases. Prevention, early recognition, diagnosis and rapid intervention are the best steps to manage aquatic animal diseases. If you observe clinical signs, abnormal behaviour and unusual mortality, contact your local aquaculture health professionals to report and ask for support.

Biosecurity in tilapia production

A presentation given at The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) held the 4th Global Conference on Aquatic Animal Health from 2 to 4 April 2019, in Santiago, Chile. Tilapia is very important for food and nutrition security, livelihoods and income for rural households in Asia and Africa. Importance attached to biosecurity and health management must be at the same level as for shrimps and salmon. This calls for a massive change in the way farmers, researchers and policy makers treat carps and tilapia with respect to overall biosecurity and health management.

Typology of interventions aiming to reduce antimicrobial use (AMU) in aquaculture systems in low and middle-income countries

This poster aims to conduct a typology analysis of interventions to reduce antimicrobial use (AMU) in aquaculture systems of low and Aim middle income countries and provide an overview of the policy landscape affecting AMU. Poster presented at the Second international conference - Quantification, Benchmarking and Stewardship of Veterinary Antimicrobial Usage, held in Bern, Switzerland from 2-3 July 2019.

Dietary administration of probiotics modulates non-specific immunity and gut microbiota of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) cultured in low input ponds

Poor culture conditions in low input ponds make fish highly susceptible to infectious pathogens which lead to diseases and mortalities yet the effects of probiotics on immunity, gut microbiota and microbiological quality of fish in low input ponds are unknown. Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings (40 g) were randomly stocked at 50 fish m-3 in 1.25 m3 cages in low input ponds. The fish were fed on diets supplemented with either Saccharomyces cerevisiae (1 × 1010 CFU g-1) or Bacillus subtilis (1 × 109 CFU g-1) at six levels: Diet 0 (No probiotic); S.

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