Fish diversity and fish consumption in Bangladesh

Bangladesh prides itself on being very rich in fish diversity. Its numeroud and diverse inland waterbodies and paddy fields are home to over 267 freshwater fish species. Biodiversity of fish species is important for nutrition and livelihoods of the rural poor in Bangladesh. There are promising fisheries technologies which have been developed and are being practised for improving fish biodiversity and nutrition.

Fish culture in homestead tanks in Nigeria: practices, problems and prospects.

The results are presented of a 2-year study conducted regarding management practices and problems associated with raising fish in concrete tanks in Nigeria. The location and construction of the tanks, which were used toculture Clarias gariepinus, Tilapia guineensis and Heterobranchus bidorsalis , are described, and suggestions made for overcoming the problems involved, which were mainly due to poor management skills. Major problems identified included incidence of "broken skull" disease in C.

Feed the Future Sierra Leone Agriculture Project

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Feed the Future Sierra Leone Agriculture Project supports the development of rice and fish farming systems to increase productivity and improve food and nutrition security and incomes. This factsheet outlines the key components. The project focuses on Tonkolili District, which has the highest prevalence of stunting and underweight among children under 5 in the country.

Farmers' attitudes in Malawi to the use of excreta in fish farming

The findings are presented of a survey conducted in Malawi to determine the acceptability by fish farmers of raisingfish in excreta-fed ponds. The use of livestock excreta appeared to be acceptable to the majority of farmers, whereas the use of human excreta was not. Various recommendations are made regarding the promotion of the use of excreta in small-holder farms.

Effects of stocking density on production and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) culture in a rain fed rice-fish ecosystem

Effects of stocking density on the growth, production, and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were investigated in a rain-fed rice-fish ecosystem for a period of 120 days. Fish were stocked at the rate of 4000, 5000, and 6000 ha-1 in treatments T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Water quality was suitable for fish culture. Significantly higher growth was observed in T1 as compared to other treatments. SGR ranged from 1.26 to 1.51. Survival varied between 79% and 88% with treatment T1 producing the highest survival.

Effect of freshwater toxic and non toxic cyanobacteria, (Microcystis aeruginosa) strains on some biochemical parameters of Oreochromis niloticus

This study was planned to determine the grazing rate of O. niloticus from both toxic and non toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa with its effect on fish health through study of some clinical signs, hematological and biochemical parameters.

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