The Social context of the Chinese food system: An Ethnographic study of the Beijing seafood market

China’s role in the global food system has expanded immensely in recent years. In the seafood sector, it is now the largest consumer of seafood products in the world, making the Chinese market highly significant for global fisheries. Drawing on ethnographic- and interview-based research in the largest seafood market in Beijing, this paper analyzes the social context of Chinese consumption and trade.

Informal artisanal fish trade in West Africa: Improving cross-border trade

In West Africa, fishing and trading in fish and fishery products has been practiced for centuries and makes a significant contribution to per capita GDP. This policy brief illustrates fish trade flows in West Africa, and includes estimates of volumes, values, key traded fish species, the main value chain actors and challenges being experienced by these actors. It also recommends options that should be considered for policy formulation and implementation by national and regional policy makers.

Fish to 2050 in the ASEAN region

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has emerged as a global fish producer, owing to the rapid growth of aquaculture in Southeast Asia and its large offshore fishing fleet. Fish is a regional commodity that is traded globally, and this region is at the frontline of the global trend toward meeting seafood demand by 2050. Fisheries and aquaculture are increasingly becoming a primary source of protein and micronutrients, foreign exchange, livelihoods and well-being for the population in the region.

Do fish scales matter? Diversification and differentiation in seafood commodity chains

Recent studies in the literature on fisheries trade have contrasted the challenges and opportunities associated with domestic and internationally oriented fish trade. We examine forms of domestic and international fish trade in a municipality of the Philippines to show the empirical complexities of how fish trade unfolds on the ground. We draw on insights from the literature in livelihoods to highlight how the debate on fisheries trade can benefit from closer attention to the social and economic context of fisher livelihoods.

Aquatic product consumption patterns and perceptions among the Chinese middle class

The Chinese market for aquatic products is the largest in the world, and growing rapidly. An increasingly large proportion of Chinese aquatic product consumption is coming from imported sources, making the market of high significance not only for stakeholders in China, but from around the world. Yet little is understood about the key characteristics of this market. In this paper we surveyed 300 middle-class urban consumers of aquatic products in Beijing and Shanghai about patterns of aquatic product consumption and attitudes towards sustainability.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

Trading-off fish biodiversity, food security, and hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

The Mekong River Basin, site of the biggest inland fishery in the world, is undergoing massive hydropower development. Planned dams will block critical fish migration routes between the river's downstream floodplains and upstream tributaries. Here we estimate fish biomass and biodiversity losses in numerous damming scenarios using a simple ecological model of fish migration. Our framework allows detailing trade-offs between dam locations, power production, and impacts on fish resources.

Sustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women

Women are active participants in aquaculture supply chains, but a dearth of gender-disaggregated information hampers accurate understanding of their contribution. Research results and FAO National Aquaculture Sector Overview (NASO) fact sheets show that female participation rates vary by type and scale of enterprise and country. Women are frequently active in hatcheries and dominate fish processing plant labourers. Women’s work in small-scale aquaculture frequently is unrecognized, under or unpaid.

Strategic review of the fishery situation in Thailand

Fisheries are an important source of animal protein for most of Thailand’s population, particularly in provinces on or near the coast. Between 1978 and 1997 the per capita consumption of fish averaged 24 kg·capita-1 annually. In 1995, about 535 210 people were involved in the fisheries sector and 44% of these were engaged in small scale marine capture fisheries. Since 1982, Thailand has faced problems with the development of marine capture fisheries and their over-exploitation which has increased fishery conflicts and disputes with neighboring countries.

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