Trading-off fish biodiversity, food security, and hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

The Mekong River Basin, site of the biggest inland fishery in the world, is undergoing massive hydropower development. Planned dams will block critical fish migration routes between the river's downstream floodplains and upstream tributaries. Here we estimate fish biomass and biodiversity losses in numerous damming scenarios using a simple ecological model of fish migration. Our framework allows detailing trade-offs between dam locations, power production, and impacts on fish resources.

The 'Fish Trader+' model: reducing female traders' vulnerability to HIV

Analysis from research and practice in Africa shows that fishing communities are hardly reached by HIV-related services, education, and business services, partly because of the efforts and costs involved and a lack of good practice in reaching out to these often remote areas. At the same time, fish traders, especially women, travel regularly to remote fishing camps to purchase fish. Although female fish traders may be exposed to HIV, violence and abuse in their interactions and relationships with fishermen, economic necessity keeps them in this trade.

Choosing the best model in the presence of zero trade: A Fish product analysis

The purpose of the chapter is to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. We use zero-accounting gravity models to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. The chemical standards on which we focus include chloramphenicol required performance limit, oxytetracycline maximum residue limit, fluoro-quinolones maximum residue limit, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pesticide residue limit.

Informal artisanal fish trade in West Africa: Improving cross-border trade

In West Africa, fishing and trading in fish and fishery products has been practiced for centuries and makes a significant contribution to per capita GDP. This policy brief illustrates fish trade flows in West Africa, and includes estimates of volumes, values, key traded fish species, the main value chain actors and challenges being experienced by these actors. It also recommends options that should be considered for policy formulation and implementation by national and regional policy makers.

Aquatic product consumption patterns and perceptions among the Chinese middle class

The Chinese market for aquatic products is the largest in the world, and growing rapidly. An increasingly large proportion of Chinese aquatic product consumption is coming from imported sources, making the market of high significance not only for stakeholders in China, but from around the world. Yet little is understood about the key characteristics of this market. In this paper we surveyed 300 middle-class urban consumers of aquatic products in Beijing and Shanghai about patterns of aquatic product consumption and attitudes towards sustainability.

Strategic review of the fishery situation in Thailand

Fisheries are an important source of animal protein for most of Thailand’s population, particularly in provinces on or near the coast. Between 1978 and 1997 the per capita consumption of fish averaged 24 kg·capita-1 annually. In 1995, about 535 210 people were involved in the fisheries sector and 44% of these were engaged in small scale marine capture fisheries. Since 1982, Thailand has faced problems with the development of marine capture fisheries and their over-exploitation which has increased fishery conflicts and disputes with neighboring countries.

Standard harmonization as chasing zero (tolerance limits): the impact of veterinary drug residue standards on crustacean imports in the EU, Japan, and North America

Food safety standards in the seafood trade between developing country exporters and developed country importers have been a topic of much discussion in the trade literature. As an important source of foreign currency earnings and employment for many lower income developing countries, stricter safety standards in seafood may have the potential to pose barriers to trade, especially for many Asian seafood exporters. This paper investigates the impact of stricter drug residue (chloramphenicol) standards on crustacean imports to Canada, the EU15, Japan, and the United States.

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