WorldFish in Myanmar

WorldFish is working with the Myanmar Government and other partners to create a policy environment to improve fisheries management and capture more economic, social and environmental benefits for the long term. The WorldFish integrated research and development program is endorsed by the government and seeks to unlock the potential for growth in aquaculture, for example in the many household ponds in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Central Dry Zone, Shan State and Sagaing Region. Scaling-up smallholder aquaculture can bring benefits such as better incomes, nutrition and health.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

What influences the form that community-based fisheries management takes in Vanuatu

Vanuatu has a long history of efforts to manage coastal fisheries, from customary practices to various forms of contemporary community-based fisheries management (CBFM) promoted by non-governmental organisations and government projects. In this article we summarise how the experiences and lessons over the last 25 years have shaped the CBFM model Vanuatu now uses.

A typology of fisheries management tools: using experience to catalyse greater success

Fisheries provide nutrition and livelihoods for coastal populations, but many fisheries are fully or over-exploited and we lack an approach for analysing which factors affect management tool performance. We conducted a literature review of 390 studies to assess how fisheries characteristics affected management tool performance across both small-scale and large-scale fisheries. We defined success as increased or maintained abundance or biomass, reductions in fishing mortality or improvements in population status.

Transboundary research in fisheries

Spatial boundaries have become an indispensable part of regimes and tools for regulating fisheries, with examples including marine protected areas, regional fisheries management organizations and Exclusive Economic Zones. Yet, it is also widely acknowledged that boundaries are a social construct, which may be resisted by both fishers and fish ecology. The ensuing spatial and institutional mismatches have been shown to frustrate management efforts, exacerbating issues of non-compliance and ultimately leading to conflicts and overfishing.

Strengthening post-hoc analysis of community-based fisheries management through the social-ecological systems framework

Community-based fisheries management (CBFM) is held up as one of the most promising approaches for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries. Yet, the complex features that shape CBFM outcomes remain inadequately understood. In part, this stems from the fact that few community-based projects meet the data requirements for formal impact evaluations. Given this context, diagnostic approaches are increasingly seen as a frontier for strengthening CBFM analysis and securing small-scale fisheries sustainability.

Status of Fish Aggregating Device fishery in the River Titas of Bangladesh

This paper aims to examine the status of Fish Aggregating Device (Katha) fishery in the river Titas in Bangladesh and development of an alternative Katha fishery management strategy. All Fish Aggregating Devices (Kathas) were recorded through a census survey. Fish catch monitoring facilitated through a regular catch survey of Katha/gear/team in operation. The study employed data collected from the river Titas in Brahmanbaria district of Bangladesh from 1997 to 2002.

Spreading community-based resource management: Testing the “lite-touch” approach in Solomon Islands

In Solomon Islands, community-based resource management (CBRM) is the main strategy for managing coastal fisheries. Although hundreds of communities have implemented CBRM already, the majority of Solomon Islands communities have not, and it is not realistic for partner organisations such as non-governmental organisations and government agencies to spread the concept of CBRM by engaging communities individually.

Sharing Pacific nearshore FAD expertise

Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are gaining momentum in the Pacific region as a tool to enhance food security and income for fishers and communities, and to reduce pressure on the resources of lagoons and reef fisheries. A lot of experience has been gained by countries across the Pacific. There have been, however, limited opportunities for nearshore FAD practitioners to come together to share this experience in order to advance the implementation and use of nearshore FADs in the Pacific.

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