Better management practices for genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) in Timor-Leste

Worldwide, the demand for fish continues to grow rapidly. Sustainable intensification and expansion of aquaculture and innovations in fish production systems will be needed to meet this increased demand. It is with this in mind that WorldFish’s 2017–2022 strategy and the CGIAR Research Program on Fish-Agri-Food Systems (FISH) (2017– 2022) have emphasized the need for doubling total food fish production by 2030, particularly in developing countries.

How scientific evidence can build cross-sector bridges for a better blue economy: Five questions with Dr. Gareth Johnstone, WorldFish DG

The oceans’ resources are critical to life on earth, ranging from providing fish to enabling sea transport, and from mitigating climate change to tourism. These economic sectors and related policies together determine whether the use of oceanic resources is sustainable and equitable, a concept known as the ‘blue economy’.

Multi-scale policy diffusion and translation in Pacific Island coastal fisheries

Multilateral consensus forged among heads of states must be value-additive and relevant at the national level to facilitate on-ground implementation. Yet, despite general optimism and advances in policy understanding, multi-scale diffusion remains a challenge with little certainty in outcomes. This study focuses on examining intermediary dynamics occurring within national policy apparatus that can influence domestic uptake of policy innovation.

Situating human rights in the context of fishing rights: Contributions and contradictions

Human rights have become a salient topic in fisheries governance. This paper clarifies key terms involved in a human rights-based approach as they pertain to fishing rights. Four conceptual tension between human rights and fishing rights are discussed. Understanding such contradictions will be important for mitigating shortcomings in practice. The authors offer a way forward to inform future implementation of human rights in the context of fishing rights allocation.

Strengthening and scaling community-based approaches to Pacific coastal fisheries management in support of the New Song

In the small island developing states of the Pacific, catching, trading and eating fish are central to the way of life and local and national economies. Local and external pressures on marine resources, and high reliance on fisheries as a livelihood, mean that improving and sustaining fisheries benefits is a key pathway to improve human wellbeing and contribute to food and nutrition security. This project aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more resilient fisheries as a foundation. The project contributes to the Pacific Community's New Song strategy, which calls for a stronger, co-ordinated approach to developing and managing coastal fisheries. The project aims to: (1) strengthen Pacific institutions to implement the New Song for coastal fisheries; (2) improve and scale out CBFM in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; (3) improve the opportunities, viability and performance of livelihoods in support of CBFM initiatives; (4) increase social and gender equity in coastal fisheries governance, utilization and benefit distribution; and (5) promote food and nutrition security in the Pacific food system through improved management and use of fish. The project builds on community-based management and multi-level governance efforts in preceding projects led by WorldFish with national and regional partners.

Global conference: 12th Asian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum

Theme: Transforming Asian Fisheries and Aquaculture for Sustainable Production and Nutrition

 

The Asian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum (AFAF) is one of the important activities of the Asian Fisheries Society as it provides an international platform for distinguished scientists from all over the world to discuss the issues pertaining to sustainable fisheries and aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific Region. The forum has been convened 11 times to date around the Asian region.

Narrative assemblages for power-balanced coastal and marine governance. Tara Bandu as a tool for community-based fisheries co-management in Timor-Leste

Poverty alleviation and resource governance are inextricably related. Mainstream resource management has been typically criticized by social scientists for the inherent power imbalances between fishery managers and small-scale fishing communities. Yet, while a number of mechanisms of collective action to address these power imbalances have been developed, they remain undertheorized.

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