Status of Fish Aggregating Device fishery in the River Titas of Bangladesh

This paper aims to examine the status of Fish Aggregating Device (Katha) fishery in the river Titas in Bangladesh and development of an alternative Katha fishery management strategy. All Fish Aggregating Devices (Kathas) were recorded through a census survey. Fish catch monitoring facilitated through a regular catch survey of Katha/gear/team in operation. The study employed data collected from the river Titas in Brahmanbaria district of Bangladesh from 1997 to 2002.

Sharing Pacific nearshore FAD expertise

Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are gaining momentum in the Pacific region as a tool to enhance food security and income for fishers and communities, and to reduce pressure on the resources of lagoons and reef fisheries. A lot of experience has been gained by countries across the Pacific. There have been, however, limited opportunities for nearshore FAD practitioners to come together to share this experience in order to advance the implementation and use of nearshore FADs in the Pacific.

Operationalising access to oceanic fisheries resources by small-scale fishers to improve food security in the Pacific Islands

Maintaining the level of fish consumption in Pacific Island countries recommended for good nutrition as the populations of coastal communities grow, and as coral reefs are degraded by global warming and ocean acidification, will depend on small-scale fishers catching more tuna and other large pelagic fish. Concerted research and development by regional agencies shows that nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) provide one way for small-scale fishers to make this transition.

Balancing between livelihood and biodiversity conservation: a model study on gear selectivity for harvesting small indigenous fishes in southern Bangladesh

This study has determined a suitable mesh size for small indigenous fish species (SIS) harvesting and has also developed a new gill net operation technique taking into consideration of aquatic biodiversity conservation, the daily intake of micro-nutrients and the livelihood of the rural community. It provides an insight into how employment of specialized fishing gear can help balance SIS fishing as a source of the rural community’s livelihood against biodiversity conservation.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem in the Gulf of Thailand

The biomass of 40 ecological groups, the diet composition of prey and predators, production/biomass (P/B) and consumption/biomass (Q/B) ratios, and catches were used as basic input to parameterize an Ecopath model of the Gulf of Thailand. Following construction of a mass-balance ecosystem model, a time-dynamic simulation model (Ecosim) was used to simulate the impact of change in fishing effort. This was done using time series data to validate the historic fisheries development in the Gulf of Thailand prior to using the model for forward-looking simulations.

The Structure and margins of the Lake Chilwa fisheries in Malawi: a value chain analysis

Small freshwater pelagic fisheries in closed lakes are very important to millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa providing livelihoods and nutritional security. However, returns from these fisheries have been shown to uctuate in response to climatic variability. In order to understand the impact of these fluctuations on the livelihoods of people dependant on these fisheries, there is a need for information on how the fish value chain is organized and how it functions in response to variation in supplies.

Strategic review of the fishery situation in Thailand

Fisheries are an important source of animal protein for most of Thailand’s population, particularly in provinces on or near the coast. Between 1978 and 1997 the per capita consumption of fish averaged 24 kg·capita-1 annually. In 1995, about 535 210 people were involved in the fisheries sector and 44% of these were engaged in small scale marine capture fisheries. Since 1982, Thailand has faced problems with the development of marine capture fisheries and their over-exploitation which has increased fishery conflicts and disputes with neighboring countries.

Status and management of the Java sea fisheries

The Java Sea is a major fishing ground in Indonesia contributing 31% of the national marine fisheries production. Demersal and small pelagic fishery resources account for most production in the area. During the 1960s and 1970s, strong demand for fish, which in Indonesia resulted from both increased human population and increased per capita fish consumption, stimulated the development of fishing in the Java Sea. This led to development of up-stream and down-stream industries, increases in employment opportunities, and increases in the number of fishers and fishing households.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fishing gears