Vulnerabilities in aquatic animal production

The role of aquatic animals in global food and nutrition security is increasingly recognised. The global demand for fish is increasing, leading to a need to significantly increase its supply. Securing future fish supplies through sustainable production is a challenge as major resources such as fresh water and land are becoming limited worldwide. Aquaculture and capture fisheries face various threats from both human-mediated and natural environmental change, including climate change. Aquaculture systems and practices are vulnerable to such changes.

Scaling innovative, nutrition-sensitive fisheries technologies and integrated approaches through partnerships in Odisha, India can improve food and nutrition security

Funded by the United States Agency for International Development, this project is led by WorldFish in collaboration with the Fisheries & Animal Resources Development Department of the Indian state of Odisha, along with several private sector companies. Its aim is to improve food and nutrition security in Odisha by increasing the supply of and access to affordable, safe, nutrient-rich fish and fish products for greater consumption.

Sustainable aquaculture and fisheries in Odisha, India, through technical collaboration with the Fisheries and Animal Resources Development Department

On June 28, 2016, WorldFish headquarters in Malaysia signed a memorandum of agreement with the Fisheries and Animal Resources Development Department (F&ARD) of the Government of Odisha, India, in the august presence of Sri Naveen Patnaik, Honourable Chief Minister of Odisha to implement a project called Technical Collaboration for Implementation of the Odisha Fisheries Policy 2015. It runs from July 2016 to March 2022 (5 years and 9 months).

Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART) in Assam, India, for sustainably increasing fish production and productivityThe Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for

The Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for implementation of the Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART). The Project Development Objective is to add value and improve the resilience of selected agriculture value chains, focusing on smallholder farmers and agro-entrepreneurs in targeted districts of Assam. Fish has been prioritized as one of the value chains for interventions under APART.

Impacts of epizootic ulcerative syndrome on subsistence fisheries and wildlife

Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), caused by the water mould (Oomycota) Aphanomyces invadans, has spread throughout the world’s major continents over the last 50 years, with the apparent exception of South and Central America. With over 160 susceptible fish species representing 54 families and 16 orders recorded to date, EUS is of international concern and infection with A. invadans is a World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed disease.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices show positive outcomes for sustainable fisheries development in Timor-Leste

Capture fisheries in small island developing states (SIDS) have the capacity to increase access to vital micronutrient-rich food to tackle malnutrition, but when fishers are restricted to nearshore habitats by limited capacity (boats, engines, fishing gear), fisheries production can be low. This is the case of coastal Timor-Leste, where some of the world’s most diverse coral reefs are juxtaposed with one of the world’s most undernourished populations.

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