The impacts of aquaculture development on food security: lessons from Bangladesh

Fish contribute a significant amount of animal protein to the diets of people in Bangladesh, about 63% of which comes from aquatic animals. In Bangladesh, fish is mainly derived from two sources: capture and culture. Aquaculture has shown tremendous growth in the last two decades, exhibiting by about 10% average annual growth in production.

Managing climatic risks for enhanced food security: key information capabilities

Food security is expected to face increasing challenges from climatic risks that are more and more exacerbated by climate change, especially in the developing world. This document lists some of the main capabilities that have been recently developed, especially in the area of operational agroclimatology, for an efficient use of natural resources and a better management of climatic risks. It also lists some of the capabilities available to practitioners and decision-makers, starting with the dissemination of agroclimatic data analyses and advice.

Wetlands governance in the Mekong Region: country reports on the legal-institutional framework and economic valuation of aquatic resources

Wetlands are central to the livelihoods of rural communities through out the Mekong Region, providing vital functions and services that support the rural economy, ensure food security for the most vulnerable membrs of society, and underpin the prospects for national development. Proper appreciation of the importance of wetlands has been hampered by inadequate information and awareness of their uses, particularly among development planners, as well as legal and institutional frameworks that are often fragmented and poorly enforced.

Floods, floodplains and fish production in the Mekong basin: present and past trends

This paper deals with relationships between hydrology, wetlands and fisheries production in the Mekong River Basin. A five-year monitoring of the bag net ("dai") fishery in the Tonle Sap River (Cambodia) showed a strong correlation between catches and water level in the same year. One taxon making up to 37% of total catches explains most of the relationships between catches and water level. The current overall catch in the Tonle Sap system amounts 230,000 tons a year. When compared with historical surveys, this catch is twice as much as the catch 60 years ago.

Development of fisheries co-management in Cambodia : a case study and its implications

The livelihoods and food security of many Cambodians depend heavily on inland capture fisheries, so the sustainable management of these fisheries is very important. Notwithstanding, the sustainability of Mekong fisheries is threatened by increasing fishing pressure and habitat modifications. Current management is considered insufficiently capable of controlling levels of exploitation and achieving equitable distribution of the resource, and the Cambodian government is promoting co-management initiatives as a way of addressing these issues.

Agricultural development and the opportunities for aquatic resources research in China

China is a large and rapidly developing country. Fisheries and aquaculture have been prominent sectors in the contribution to GDP and the provision of food security, export revenue, and livelihoods for the poor. The rapid development has come at some cost to the environment and the sustainability of natural resources. Levels of marine fisheries catches are stagnant. Some of the rivers and major lakes are polluted and the restoration of the productivity of these lakes is of key concern.

Culture of fish in rice fields

Rice is presently grown in 113 countries. Rice farming also offers a suitable environment for the culture of fish and other aquatic organism. This publication synthesizes the available information on the role that aquaculture can play in rice-based farming systems towards food security and poverty alleviation.

Investing in Africa: the WorldFish Center's African strategy in summary

Across much of Africa, freshwater and coastal fisheries provide an important source of food and livelihood for many millions of people. In addition, the aquaculture potential of the continent has only recently begun to be developed. To help sustain these capture fisheries, support the emergence of aquaculture and foster the contribution of both to sustainable livelihoods and improved food security, the WorldFish Center is increasing its investment in Africa.

Sustainable agro-pisciculture in Malawi: contributing to food and nutritional security in a densely populated country

The promotion of integrated aquacultureagriculture has been achieved through collaborative efforts of the Malawi Government, WorldFish Center (formerly ICLARM) development partners (principally Germany and U.S.A.) and NGOs. The basic principle of integrated agro-pisciculture is to grow fish in waterbodies that are closely integrated into, and intentionally make use of the resource flows of all the diverse activities on a farm.

Methodology for economic valuation of food security and vulnerability to poverty for inland fisheries in Africa

Fish play an increasingly important role in national and local economies of many developing countries. Africa’s rivers, wetlands and lakes are especially important for poor rural households for whom they provide employment and income opportunities in areas where other economic alternatives are scarce or inexistent. They also provide nutritional safetynets in these regions with limited roads and access to market. However, policy makers and regional decision makers tend to underrate fisheries, in particular inland small-scale fisheries.

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