From happy hour to hungry hour: Logging, fisheries and food security in Malaita, Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands Government (SIG) has followed a logging-based development strategy for the past three decades. Despite widespread acknowledgment of the unsustainable nature of logging throughout the country and increasing awareness of its social impacts, national log export volumes have steadily increased over the past 10 years. Malaita Province has followed this trend. Logging operations are conducted by foreign (predominantly Malaysian) companies in collaboration with local licensees.

Fish, trade and food security: Moving beyond ‘availability’ discourse in marine conservation

The goal of food security increasingly serves as an objective and justification for marine conservation in the global south. In the marine conservation literature this potential link is seldom based upon detailed analysis of the socioeconomic pathways between fish and food security, is often based on limited assumptions about increasing the availability of fish stocks, and downplays the role of trade. Yet, the relationship between fish and food security is multi-faceted and complex, with various local contextual factors that mediate between fish and food security.

Fish consumption in urban Lusaka: The need for aquaculture to improve targeting of the poor

Aquaculture in Zambia is growing and likely to play an important role for food and nutrition security in the country. While outputs in capture fisheries and small-scale aquaculture are stagnating, commercial aquaculture holds promising potential to help increasing the availability and accessibility of fish in the country, especially for the poor. While fish supply per capita has increased over the last decade, little is known on the fish consumption patterns and the role of farmed fish in the diets of resource-poor households.

Fish and meat are often withheld from the diets of infants 6 to 12 months in fish-farming households in rural Bangladesh

Fish is a widely available animal-source food in Bangladesh and a rich source of nutrients, yet little is known about practices related to incorporating fish into the diets of infants and young children. Our study makes use of dietary diversity data collected from households participating in a homestead aquaculture project in rural Bangladesh, a population that we hypothesized would have greater than average access to fish.

Aquaculture in Zambia: An overview and evaluation of the sector’s responsiveness to the needs of the poor

Given the recent expansion and commercialization of aquaculture in Zambia, an important question that needs to be explored is how have the recent changes in the Zambian aquaculture sector contributed to the needs of the poor? The aim of this report is to (a) outline the current trajectory of aquaculture development in Zambia and (b) evaluate whether these development efforts are inclusive of and responsive to the needs of the poor.

Aquaculture for income and nutrition : Final report

The United States Agency for International Development-Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (USAID-AIN) project, implemented by WorldFish, emphasized technology development for improved fish strains, and capacity building in hatcheries and nurseries for wider dissemination and uptake among small- and medium-scale household and commercial producers. Improving nutritional benefits from household aquaculture investment was also an important activity of the project.

Using theory of change to achieve impact in AAS

The CGIAR Strategy and Results Framework sets out four system level outcomes (SLOs), namely: reducing rural poverty, improving food security, improving nutrition and health and sustainable management of natural resources. In pursuit of these objectives the CGIAR has developed a set of sixteen CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs), each of which is expected to make specific contributions to a range of intermediate development outcomes (IDOs) linked to the SLOs.

Is Aquaculture pro-poor? Empirical evidence of impacts on fish consumption in Bangladesh

Aquaculture is widely held to contribute to poverty reduction and food security in the Global South, but robust evidence is limited. Using nationally representative data from Bangladesh, this study analyses changes in fish consumption from 2000 to 2010. Rapid expansion of commercial aquaculture pegged down fish prices, resulting in increased fish consumption by extreme poor and moderate poor consumers and those in rural areas. These outcomes are closely linked to the pro-poor nature of national economic growth during this period.

Increasing water productivity in agriculture

Increasing water productivity is an important element in improved water management for sustainable agriculture, food security and healthy ecosystem functioning. Water productivity is defined as the amount of agricultural output per unit of water depleted, and can be assessed for crops, trees, livestock and fish. This chapter reviews challenges in and opportunities for improving water productivity in socially equitable and sustainable ways by thinking beyond technologies, and fostering enabling institutions and policies.

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