Seasonal loans and marketing training lead to aquaculture success for small-scale farmers in Sierra Leone

In Sierra Leone, Tonkolili District is one of the poorest and most nutritionally insecure regions, with a 25 percent childhood stunting rate. Involving poor farmers in small-scale aquaculture, particularly with a business focus, has huge potential to help combat this problem by increasing fish consumption and incomes.

Yet despite the large number of perennial swamps suited to fish farming, the small-scale aquaculture sector is largely undeveloped, and poor farmers face several barriers when trying to establish a fish farm business.

Hidden harvest: The global contribution of capture fisheries

The important contribution of fi sheries to human well-being is frequently underestimated. This report highlights that contribution. The report focuses on small-scale fi sheries and developing countries because the livelihoods of 90 percent of the 120 million employed in fi sheries are in the small-scale fi sheries, and almost all of those workers, 97 percent, live in developing countries. Many small-scale fi shing communities have high levels of poverty, and poverty reduction is a core focus of the contributing partners to the report.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

Livelihood diversity and dynamism in Timor-Leste; insights for coastal resource governance and livelihood development

Coastal communities within small island developing states are typically highly dependent on fisheries and other natural resource-based livelihoods. However, specialisation as a ‘fisher’ is rare compared to diverse livelihoods that can be adapted as opportunities and challenges emerge. Understanding this dynamic “livelihood landscape” is important for improving governance and livelihood opportunities associated with natural resources.

Increasing productivity and improving livelihoods in aquatic agricultural systems: a review of interventions

The doubling of global food demand by 2050 is driving resurgence in interventions for agricultural intensification. Globally, 700 million people are dependent on floodplain or coastal systems. Increased productivity in these aquatic agricultural systems is important for meeting current and future food demand. Agricultural intensification in aquatic agricultural systems has contributed to increased agricultural production, yet these increases have not necessarily resulted in broader development outcomes for those most in need.

From happy hour to hungry hour: Logging, fisheries and food security in Malaita, Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands Government (SIG) has followed a logging-based development strategy for the past three decades. Despite widespread acknowledgment of the unsustainable nature of logging throughout the country and increasing awareness of its social impacts, national log export volumes have steadily increased over the past 10 years. Malaita Province has followed this trend. Logging operations are conducted by foreign (predominantly Malaysian) companies in collaboration with local licensees.

Fish, trade and food security: Moving beyond ‘availability’ discourse in marine conservation

The goal of food security increasingly serves as an objective and justification for marine conservation in the global south. In the marine conservation literature this potential link is seldom based upon detailed analysis of the socioeconomic pathways between fish and food security, is often based on limited assumptions about increasing the availability of fish stocks, and downplays the role of trade. Yet, the relationship between fish and food security is multi-faceted and complex, with various local contextual factors that mediate between fish and food security.

Fish consumption in urban Lusaka: The need for aquaculture to improve targeting of the poor

Aquaculture in Zambia is growing and likely to play an important role for food and nutrition security in the country. While outputs in capture fisheries and small-scale aquaculture are stagnating, commercial aquaculture holds promising potential to help increasing the availability and accessibility of fish in the country, especially for the poor. While fish supply per capita has increased over the last decade, little is known on the fish consumption patterns and the role of farmed fish in the diets of resource-poor households.

Fish and meat are often withheld from the diets of infants 6 to 12 months in fish-farming households in rural Bangladesh

Fish is a widely available animal-source food in Bangladesh and a rich source of nutrients, yet little is known about practices related to incorporating fish into the diets of infants and young children. Our study makes use of dietary diversity data collected from households participating in a homestead aquaculture project in rural Bangladesh, a population that we hypothesized would have greater than average access to fish.

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