Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Indonesian aquaculture futures: An analysis of fish supply and demand in Indonesia to 2030 and role of aquaculture using the AsiaFish model

This paper explores the seafood sector in Indonesia, using fish supply-demand modeling, with special focus on the growing role of aquaculture in the country's food portfolio. The paper describes six scenarios for future fish supply-demand dynamics and examines the role of aquaculture growth in fish supply in Indonesia.

Increasing social-ecological resilience within small-scale agriculture in conflict-affected Guatemala

Climate change scenarios suggest largely detrimental impacts on agricultural production from a deterioration of renewable natural resources. Over the last 15 years, a new field of research has focused on the interactions between climate and conflict risk, particularly as it relates to competition over natural resources and livelihoods. Within this field, there has been less attention to the potential for resource competition to be managed in ways that yield greater cooperation, local adaptation capacity, social-ecological resilience, and conflict mitigation or prevention.

FISH: CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems: Proposal

The goal of CRP Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) is to achieve sustainable increases in the gender and socially inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to improve the livelihoods and nutrition of poor households in priority geographies. The objectives of FISH are the following: 1. Enable sustainable increases in, and gender- and socially equitable livelihood returns from, aquaculture production without creating adverse socio-economic or environmental impacts. 2.

The First International Conference and Exhibition on Sustainable Development of Aquaculture. Corniche El Nile, Garden City, Cairo, Egypt 20–22 November 2017

The First International Conference and Exhibition on Sustainable Development of Aquaculture is organized jointly by WorldFish and the Central Laboratory for Aquaculture Research in Egypt. The aim of the conference is to bring together international stakeholders in the aquaculture industry to discuss solutions to challenges facing the sector in Egypt, and the African continent writ large, by sharing ideas and experiences from around the world.

Value-chain analysis of Egyptian aquaculture

Egypt’s aquaculture production (705,490 tonnes in 2009) is by far the largest of any African country and places it 11th in terms of global production. The aquaculture sector makes a significant contribution to income, employment creation and food security in the country, all of which are national priority areas given low per capita income levels, rising population, worsening food security indicators, and official unemployment levels which have remained at around 10% for the last ten years.

Transforming gender relations: Key to positive development outcomes in aquatic agricultural systems

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is committed to improving the food security and wellbeing of poor people who depend on freshwater and coastal ecosystems for their livelihoods. AAS is particularly concerned with enhancing the equity of the social, economic and political structures that influence the livelihoods of poor households dependent on aquatic agricultural systems.

Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development.

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