Intra-household impacts of climate hazards and autonomous adaptation in selected coastal areas of Zamboanga del Norte

This study described the implications and issues of coastal hazards on the internal dynamics of decision making within the household. Flooding and typhoon were recognized as the common hazardsin the communities. Adaptation strategies within households of male and female decision makers were also identified during the survey. Community plans to adapt to specific coastal hazards were also laid down in village-level discussions. We identified six coastal barangays from the three local government unitsin Zamboanga del Norte that were most prone to hazards.

Intra-household impacts of climate change hazards and autonomous adaptation: Evidence from Bohol, Philippine

This study is an attempt to systematically study the intra-household implications and issues of climate-related shocks or hazards. We look at how the internal dynamics of decision making within the household and the joint adaptive action of household members (particularly the husband and wife) affect outcomes/risks for different groups and individuals within the household itself. The areas covered in the study are three municipalities in the province of Bohol, Philippines, namely, Anda, Bien Unido, and Inabanga, which are all coastal areas in the province.

Integrated systems research in nutrition-sensitive landscapes: A Theoretical methodological framework

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

Innovation and gendered negotiations: Insights from six small-scale fishing communities

There has so far been limited investigation into gender in relation to innovation in fisheries. Therefore, this study investigates how gender relations shape the capacity and motivation of different individuals in fishing communities to innovate. We compare six fishing communities in Cambodia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. Our findings suggest that gendered negotiations mediate the capacity to innovate but that wider structural constraints are important constraints for both men and women.

Official Launch of the NRDC – Aquaculture Skills Training Centre & Fisheries and Aquaculture curriculum, and online Training Platform

An event to officially launch the research innovations developed to enhance the aquaculture sector through research and development by WorldFish in partnership with The Natural Resources development College (NRDC) and other partners and funded by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad). 

Date: Wednesday, 23 December 2020

Time: 15:00 – 18:00 (UTC+8)

Click here to register and save your spot 

The impact of gender blindness on social-ecological resilience: The case of a communal pasture in the highlands of Ethiopia

The authors studied how the failure to take into account gendered roles in the management of a communal pasture in the highlands of Ethiopia can affect the resilience of this social-ecological system. This paper integrates resilience analysis and gender analysis, to increase our understanding of processes that may undermine the ability of a social-ecological system to cope with, to adapt to, and to shape change.

Homestead pond polyculture can improve access to nutritious small fish

In Bangladesh, homestead pond aquaculture currently comprises a polyculture of large fish species but provides an ideal environment to integrate a range of small fish species. Small fish consumed whole, with bones, head and eyes, are rich in micronutrients and are an integral part of diets, particularly for the poor. Results from three large projects demonstrate that the small fish, mola (Amblypharyngodon mola) contributes significantly to the micronutrients produced from all fish, in homestead ponds, in one production cycle.

Gender relations and improved technologies in small household ponds in Bangladesh: Rolling out novel learning approaches

Gender-transformative engagement in the management of household ponds in Bangladesh for improved fish production relies on working with the complexities of gender relations in combination with a readiness by formally-trained scientists to allow women and men farmers to "follow the technology". Innovative methodologies for technology development and dissemination need to focus on promoting farmer adaptive capacity and enabling farmers to take charge of their own learning. This is not a gender-neutral process.

Gender norms and agricultural innovation: Insights from six villages in Bangladesh

The ability of development interventions to catalyse and support innovation for—and by— women and men is undermined by lack of specific understanding about how gender norms interact with gender relations and what this means for innovation. This is also the case for Bangladesh despite substantive research and development investments in the past decade that have placed emphasis on gender norms, particularly those inhibiting women and girl’s education, women and girl’s health, and women’s economic empowerment.

Gender inequalities in access to and benefits derived from the natural fishery in the Barotse Floodplain, Zambia, Southern Africa

People living in and around the Barotse Floodplain are some of the poorest in Zambia due to many factors restricting their abilities to engage in activities to secure food and income. Women, and in particular resident women, are especially constrained given certain gender norms and power relations that hamper them from accessing and adequately benefiting from the natural fishery. Resident women typically rely on other, less remunerative means to secure their livelihoods.

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