Gender in the farmed fish value chain of Bangladesh: A review of the evidence and development approaches

Bangladesh is the world’s fifth-largest aquaculture producer, and statistics indicate that aquaculture now makes up about 56% of the country’s total fish production in terms of value. In Bangladesh, fish is the most important food after rice. Bangladesh is considered a patriarchal society, and its predominant gender norms and attitudes reinforce women’s roles as primarily limited to domestic and care duties, which take place mainly within the confines of the homestead.

Gender in Myanmar’s small-scale aquaculture sector

WorldFish’s objective for Myanmar’s MYCulture program is to improve food and income security in the country’s Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone regions through the development of small-scale aquaculture To ensure maximum and equitable distribution of the benefits from smallscale aquaculture, the technical component of the program was complemented by a gender and nutrition benchmark study. The aim of the study was to gain an in-depth understanding of existing gender norms and social relations that may influence project outcomes and how they affect men and women differently.

Gender differences in willingness to pay for capital-intensive agricultural technologies: the case of fish solar tent dryers in Malawi

In this paper, we analyse Lake Malawi fish processors’ Willingness to pay (WTP) and identify the gender disparities that are associated with the WTP for a common good, i.e. investing in a group owned fish solar tent dryer (FSTD). We assessed the willingness to pay for group ownership of FSTD because we assumed that the initial investments are too high for individual fish processors to bear.

Gender and systems research: Leveraging change

There may be nothing new under the sun -- but there are novel and potentially potent ways of perceiving, approaching, researching, and engaging in the work of research for development. This chapter is a reflection of that. While neither gender nor systems research are new, applying a systems perspective to understanding the role of gender in agricultural development research offers much needed new insights into how this research may contribute to lasting and significant increases in productivity, food security, and livelihoods.

Gender and poverty dimensions in a value chain analysis of milkfish mariculture in Misamis Oriental, Philippines

This paper aims to describe the role of key players in the value chain for milkfish Chanos chanos (Forsskål, 1775) in a mariculture Park in Balingasag, Misamis Oriental in the Philippines with an emphasis on gender dimensions. It also estimates the value additions done by the key players and assesses implications on income distribution. Mapping the chain involved primary data collection through observations, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. The big, medium and small-scale fish cage operators – 90 % men – are the key players in production.

Gender and household decision-making in a Lao Village: implications for livelihoods in hydropower development

Hydropower development with concomitant changes in water and land regimes often results in livelihood transformation of affected people, entailing changes in intra-household decision-making upon which livelihood strategies are based. Economic factors underlying gender dimensions of household decision-making have been studied rigorously since the 1970s. However, empirical data on gender and decision-making within households, needed for evidence-based action, remain scarce. This is more so in hydropower contexts.

Gender and aquaculture value chains: A review of key issues and implications for research

Although aquaculture is the fastest growing food producing sector in the world and generates significant employment opportunities at multiple scales, men and women are not necessarily able to participate in aquaculture value chains in the same way, and benefits may not be evenly distributed between them. This paper aims to elucidate current knowledge of gendered engagement in and returns from aquaculture value chains.

FISH: CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems: Proposal

The goal of CRP Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) is to achieve sustainable increases in the gender and socially inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to improve the livelihoods and nutrition of poor households in priority geographies. The objectives of FISH are the following: 1. Enable sustainable increases in, and gender- and socially equitable livelihood returns from, aquaculture production without creating adverse socio-economic or environmental impacts. 2.

Exploring futures of Aquatic Agricultural Food Systems in Southern Africa: From drivers to future-smart research and policy options

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

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