Does sustainable intensification offer a pathway to improved food security for aquatic agricultural system-dependent communities?

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

Determinants of climate change adaptive behavior in coastal communities in Southeast Asia

This study sought to understand the determinants of autonomous adaptation of households in coastal communities in three countries (Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam) as regards climate change. The study’s main innovation is its focus on households facing a confluence of related hazards, a context that is unique to coastal communities. The study tackled the interrelated hazards of coastal erosion, flooding, and saltwater intrusion, and used a multivariate probit model to analyze the determinants.

Considering gender: Practical guidance for rural development initiatives in Solomon Islands

The majority of Solomon Islanders live in rural communities and are dependent on natural resources for their livelihoods. For many people, ways of generating income or producing food outside of small-scale fishing and agriculture are limited. Many development actors (e.g. government agencies and nongovernmental organizations) work with people in rural communities to develop and improve livelihoods, food security and environmental sustainability.

Conserving womangroves: Assessing the impacts of improved cooking stoves on resource management in Langalanga Lagoon, Solomon Islands

Firewood harvesting is a major threat to mangrove ecosystems in Solomon Islands. Improved cooking stoves could reduce firewood use and thereby ease pressure on mangroves. We conducted a field-based experiment in Langalanga Lagoon to evaluate this theory of change. Our results suggest that the so-called ‘kiko stove’, an improved cooking stove that is widely promoted in Solomon Islands, is not more efficient than cooking on an open fire in terms of cooking time and wood consumption.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food-Systems (FISH) in Myanmar

Myanmar is a country with central lowlands including a mega delta, ringed by steep rugged highlands. As the second-most important food after rice, fish is an essential component of the diet in Myanmar, where per capita fish consumption is high at over 25 kg and the preference is for freshwater fish. Domestic fish demand is growing while there is a decline in capture fisheries.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH): Gender Strategy

As embodied by Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5, gender equality and women’s empowerment are globally recognized priority development goals. The CGIAR’s alignment with these goals is embodied in its commitment to closing the gender gap and the indication that CGIAR goals contribute ‘strongly’to SDG 5. The CGIAR Research Program (CRP) on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) similarly embodies these goals and commitment, as outlined in this Gender Strategy.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH)

FISH is a collaborative global partnership to sustainably improve the productivity of aquaculture and fisheries and enhance the contribution of fish to global development goals. The CGIAR Research Program on Fish (FISH) fosters impact-driven research innovations across the whole spectrum of aquaculture and fisheries production systems and value chains, with the goal of achieving sustainable increases in gender and socially-inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to those most in need.

Bringing analysis of gender and social-ecological resilience together in small-scale fisheries research: Challenges and opportunities

The demand for gender analysis is now increasingly orthodox in natural resource programming, including that for small-scale fisheries. Whilst the analysis of social-ecological resilience has made valuable contributions to integrating social dimensions into research and policy-making on natural resource management, it has so far demonstrated limited success in effectively integrating considerations of gender equity.

Aquaculture big numbers

This research project seeks to: provide baseline information on the present status of the aquaculture sector from a human development perspective; identify the types and numbers of people employed by the sector; and explore the role of aquaculture in providing social and economic services at a global level, with a particular emphasis on small-scale stakeholders. The research findings presented here are based on a global synthesis of information from various sources and 9 country case studies in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Annual Report 2017

The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) is a new CRP that builds on earlier CRPs for Livestock and Fish (L&F) and Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) as well as prior research by WorldFish and the managing partners. Key outcomes from the two flagships of Sustainable Aquaculture and Sustaining Small-scale Fisheries during 2017, including milestones achieved, are summarized in this report.

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