Fish in food systems in Nigeria: A review

In Nigeria, like many coastal developing countries, fish is an important source of food for the population, which is currently estimated at 186 million people (World Bank 2016). A recent study estimated that Nigeria ranks third globally for the number of people dependent on coastal fisheries for food and nutrition security, and the demand for fish is growing, alongside growth in population and incomes. However, household fish consumption in Nigeria—measured at 13.3 kg/capita/year—is low compared with the world’s average of 20.3 kg/capita/year (FAO 2018).

Myanmar inland fisheries and aquaculture: A decade in review

This publication reviews the current state of knowledge of inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in Myanmar, using data from the past decade. The book aims to highlight challenges and opportunities in Myanmar’s fisheries sector, and to contribute to information sharing and capacity building for better management and sustainable use of the country’s inland aquatic resources.

Coevolutionary governance of antibiotic and pesticide resistance

Development of new biocides has dominated human responses to evolution of antibiotic and pesticide resistance. Increasing and uniform biocide use, the spread of resistance genes, and the lack of new classes of compounds indicate the importance of navigating toward more sustainable coevolutionary dynamics between human culture and species that evolve resistance.

Assessment of the local service provider model in Bangladesh

The LSP model has gained some popularity in Bangladesh in recent years and has been implemented by several projects. This assessment focuses on the LSP models implemented by Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) and Improving Food Security and Livelihoods (IFSL), specifically. This study intended to (1) describe how the models were implemented, (2) what the outcomes were, and (3) what could be done in the future to use the LSP model for scaling, especially for improving the involvement of women as LSPs.

Assessment of the local service provider model in Bangladesh

The LSP model has gained some popularity in Bangladesh in recent years and has been implemented by several projects. This assessment focuses on the LSP models implemented by Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) and Improving Food Security and Livelihoods (IFSL), specifically. This study intended to (1) describe how the models were implemented, (2) what the outcomes were, and (3) what could be done in the future to use the LSP model for scaling, especially for improving the involvement of women as LSPs.

Inclusive environmental performance through beyond-farm aquaculture governance

This paper examines the potential for improved environmental performance of smallholder aquaculture production through ‘beyond-farm’ governance. Smallholder aquaculture farmers face a range of systemic environmental risks related to disease and water quality that extend beyond the boundary of their farms. Yet most governance arrangements aimed at mitigating risks, such as certification, finance and insurance, are focused on the farm-level rather than the wider landscape within which farming takes place.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices show positive outcomes for sustainable fisheries development in Timor-Leste

Capture fisheries in small island developing states (SIDS) have the capacity to increase access to vital micronutrient-rich food to tackle malnutrition, but when fishers are restricted to nearshore habitats by limited capacity (boats, engines, fishing gear), fisheries production can be low. This is the case of coastal Timor-Leste, where some of the world’s most diverse coral reefs are juxtaposed with one of the world’s most undernourished populations.

Social equity and benefits as the nexus of a transformative Blue Economy: A sectoral review of implications

The term ‘Blue Economy’ is increasingly used in various marine sectors and development frameworks. For it to be a truly useful approach, however, we argue that social benefits and equity must be explicitly prioritized alongside environmental and economic concerns. This integration of social dimensions within the Blue Economy is required to ensure that marine economic sectors contribute to achieving sustainable development goals.

The black box of power in polycentric environmental governance

Failure to address unsustainable global change is often attributed to failures in conventional environmental governance. Polycentric environmental governance—the popular alternative—involves many centres of authority interacting coherently for a common governance goal. Yet, longitudinal analysis reveals many polycentric systems are struggling to cope with the growing impacts, pace, and scope of social and environmental change. Analytic shortcomings are also beginning to appear, particularly in the treatment of power.

Migratory fishes in Myanmar rivers and wetlands: challenges for sustainable development between irrigation water control infrastructure and sustainable inland capture fisheries

Irrigated agriculture and maintaining inland capture fisheries are both essential for food and nutrition security in Myanmar. However, irrigated agriculture through water control infrastructure, such as sluices or barrages, weirs and regulators, creates physical barriers that block migration routes of important fish species.

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