CFS47: Making a Difference in Food Security and Nutrition

A four-day event as part of a series of plenary sessions to build a global narrative towards making a difference in food security and nutrition by 2030.

Date: Monday-Thursday, 8-11 February 2021

*Stay tuned for the registration link for virtual audience*

The plenary sessions provide an opportunity to build meaningful dialogue and interaction among stakeholders groups as part of this year’s CFS47 theme, “Making a Difference in Food Security and Nutrition.”

Fish-based recipes

Appropriate and adequate dietary intake for pregnant and lactating women and also infants and young children is critical for optimal child growth and development. This booklet serves as a guide for staff from government agencies and nongovernmental organizations to integrate fish-based recipes into nutrition programs that aim to improve dietary and child feeding practices in Zambia.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

Supporting gender-inclusive dialogue over natural resource management

Rural households who fail to gain a voice in decisions over the management of shared forests, pasturelands, wetlands and fisheries face heightened risks to their livelihoods, particularly as competition increases between existing and new user groups. Exclusion from decision-making increases vulnerability of rural households, making it more difficult for them to move out of poverty and thwarting broader efforts to achieve sustainable resource management. Poor rural women in particular often face institutionalized barriers to effective participation in resource management.

Strengthening community roles in aquatic resource governance in Uganda

Lake Victoria fisheries face severe environmental stresses. Stocks are declining in a context of increasing population and growing demand for the lake’s resources. Rising competition between users is putting conservation goals and rural livelihoods at risk. While Uganda’s co-management policy framework is well-developed, key resources for implementation are lacking, enforcement is poor, and the relations between stakeholders are unequal. Poor rural resource users face significant challenges to effectively participate in fisheries decision-making.

Production and conservation of nutrient-rich small fish (SIS) in ponds and wetlands for nutrition security and livelihoods in South Asia

Small indigenous fish species (SIS) are an important source of essential macro- and micronutrients that can play an important role in the elimination of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in the populations of many South and Southeast Asian countries. Of the 260 freshwater fish species in Bangladesh, more than 140 are classified as SIS and are an integral part of the rural Bangladeshi diet. As many SIS are eaten whole, with organs and bones, they contain high amounts of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, and iron and zinc. Some SIS, such as mola, are also rich in vitamin A.

The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Post-harvest handling of low-value fish products and threats to nutritional quality: a review of practices in the Lake Victoria region

Under the Regional Programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa, implemented by the WorldFish Center in collaboration with FAO, this paper is the second in a series of papers that have been generated from reviewing literature on trends in consumption and processing of low-value fish products marketed in the Lake Victoria region. The papers fall under the programme’s research component in Uganda, analyzing nutritive quality and post-harvest activities in ‘low value’ fish market chains around Lake Victoria, focusing on Mukono District, Uganda.

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