CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic and Agricultural Systems

Nearly 500 million people in the developing world depend on aquatic agricultural systems for their livelihoods, with 140 million of these people living in poverty. Occurring along freshwater floodplains and coastal deltas, aquatic agricultural systems are highly productive farming and fishing systems that provide multiple opportunities for growing or harvesting food and generating income.

Fish-based recipes

Appropriate and adequate dietary intake for pregnant and lactating women and also infants and young children is critical for optimal child growth and development. This booklet serves as a guide for staff from government agencies and nongovernmental organizations to integrate fish-based recipes into nutrition programs that aim to improve dietary and child feeding practices in Zambia.

Production and conservation of nutrient-rich small fish (SIS) in ponds and wetlands for nutrition security and livelihoods in South Asia

Small indigenous fish species (SIS) are an important source of essential macro- and micronutrients that can play an important role in the elimination of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in the populations of many South and Southeast Asian countries. Of the 260 freshwater fish species in Bangladesh, more than 140 are classified as SIS and are an integral part of the rural Bangladeshi diet. As many SIS are eaten whole, with organs and bones, they contain high amounts of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, and iron and zinc. Some SIS, such as mola, are also rich in vitamin A.

Post-harvest handling of low-value fish products and threats to nutritional quality: a review of practices in the Lake Victoria region

Under the Regional Programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa, implemented by the WorldFish Center in collaboration with FAO, this paper is the second in a series of papers that have been generated from reviewing literature on trends in consumption and processing of low-value fish products marketed in the Lake Victoria region. The papers fall under the programme’s research component in Uganda, analyzing nutritive quality and post-harvest activities in ‘low value’ fish market chains around Lake Victoria, focusing on Mukono District, Uganda.

Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013.

The use of antibiotics in aquaculture: health and environmental issues, control and mitigation measures

This paper attempts to review the use of antibiotics in aquaculture in Malaysia because of the heightened concerns over its use and abuse and its impact on human health and the environment. Health and environmental issues relating to antibiotic use and measures that can reduce or control the impacts are also discussed.

Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: investing in sustainable solutions

The programme is assessing key risk factors among highly vulnerable target groups, including female fish traders, migrant fisher folk and youth, through surveys and par ticipatory qualitative research. Based on insights from this research, programme par tners are piloting business-based interventions that will address some of these risk factors such as lack of services in remote fishing camps and transactional sex in the context of fish marketing. These pilot interventions will generate viable business models and options for wider support to the fisheries sector.

Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: investing in sustainable solutions

The WorldFish Center and the UN FAO are currently implementing a regional programme entitled Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: investing in sustainable solutions. The programme, funded by SIDA and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, aims to strengthen regional capacity to develop sustainable solutions to enhance the contributions of fish and fisheries to development. In particular, the programme is building a strategic response to HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector that will benefit vulnerable groups in wider society.

The challenge of HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector in developing countries

People in the fisheries sector in developing countries are among those at highest risk to HIV and AIDS. Global data suggest that fisherfolk, including fishers, their families, fish processors and traders, are among high risk groups with infection rates that are five to ten times higher than in agricultural communities in the same areas. Geographically, the spread of HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector mirrors the spread in the general population, with sub-Saharan Africa showing the highest incidence.

Baseline study: nutritional status, food security and fish consumption among people living with HIV/AIDS in Zambia

Under the regional programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa, the University of Zambia, in collaboration with the WorldFish Center, has undertaken a baseline survey of the nutritional status and fish consumption of people living with HIV/AIDS in Zambia. Factors examined include household composition, education level, livelihood strategies, household food security, asset ownership, common ailments, sources of medication, the reason why children died, consumption of fish and other animal source foods, and level of nutrition education.

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