Aquatic foods and nutrition in the Pacific

National rates of aquatic food consumption in Pacific Island Countries and Territories are among the highest in the world, yet the region is suffering from extensive levels of diet-related ill health. The aim of this paper is to examine the variation in consumption patterns and in nutrient composition of aquatic foods in the Pacific, to help improve understanding of their contribution to food and nutrition security.

When is a fisher (not) a fisher? Factors that influence the decision to report fishing as an occupation in rural Cambodia

In the developing world, the majority of people who fish in inland areas do so primarily for subsistence needs. This suggests that survey or census questionnaires which collect information concerning the occupations of respondents will underreport the number of people who fish, and corollary to this, misrepresent dependence on fishing as a support service for food and supplemental income.

The socioeconomics of fish consumption and child health in Bangladesh

Child malnutrition in Bangladesh exceeds WHO's threshold for public health emergencies. Using more than 36,000 records from several waves of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, the research focuses on the socioeconomic determinants of household consumption of all animal-source foods; the socioeconomic determinants of fish consumption, given its importance in the Bangladeshi diet; and the impact of observed consumption patterns on mortality and resistance to infectious diseases for children in their first years of life.

Social considerations of large river sanctuaries: A case study from the hilsa shad fishery in Bangladesh

The establishment of a sanctuary is often suggested as an effective strategy for ecological restoration, though social aspects of such attempts are often overlooked. This study analyzed the socioeconomic status of 248 fishing households who are dependent on hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) sanctuaries in southern Bangladesh.

Sierra Leone aquaculture assessment with special emphasis on Tonkolili and Bombali districts

This assessment set out to investigate why fish farming has spread in Tonkolili District yet been poorly adopted in neighboring Bombali District. The purpose was to analyze what was working in Tonkolili but not in Bombali and then extrapolate this beyond Tonkolili. The current study aims to consolidate the most recent FAO study and map out pond distribution in Tonkolili, the most popular aquaculture development district in Sierra Leone, while also trying to make sense of this distribution.

Non-farmed fish contribute to greater micronutrient intakes than farmed fish: results from an intra-household survey in rural Bangladesh

Fish is the most important animal-source food (ASF) in Bangladesh, produced from capture fisheries (non-farmed) and aquaculture (farmed) sub-sectors. Large differences in micronutrient content of fish species from these sub-sectors exist. The aims of the present paper are to describe the importance of fish in the diets of vulnerable groups in comparison to other ASF, and the contribution of species from non-farmed and farmed sources to nutrient intakes.

Intra-household impacts of climate hazards in coastal communities: A cross-country perspective

This study is motivated by the increasing call for more gender-equitable participation and decision making in climate change adaptation. The study, therefore, revolves around the research question: Does equity in adaptation decision making and involvement between the husband and wife increase the welfare and resilience of the household? In the course of finding the answer to this question, the study also delved into the following questions: (1) What factors promote equitable adaptation decision making between the wife and husband?

Intra-household impacts of climate hazards and autonomous adaptation in selected coastal areas of Zamboanga del Norte

This study described the implications and issues of coastal hazards on the internal dynamics of decision making within the household. Flooding and typhoon were recognized as the common hazardsin the communities. Adaptation strategies within households of male and female decision makers were also identified during the survey. Community plans to adapt to specific coastal hazards were also laid down in village-level discussions. We identified six coastal barangays from the three local government unitsin Zamboanga del Norte that were most prone to hazards.

Intra-household impacts of climate change hazards and autonomous adaptation: Evidence from Bohol, Philippine

This study is an attempt to systematically study the intra-household implications and issues of climate-related shocks or hazards. We look at how the internal dynamics of decision making within the household and the joint adaptive action of household members (particularly the husband and wife) affect outcomes/risks for different groups and individuals within the household itself. The areas covered in the study are three municipalities in the province of Bohol, Philippines, namely, Anda, Bien Unido, and Inabanga, which are all coastal areas in the province.

Inland valley swamp assessment in Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone

Inland valley swamps (IVSs) form part of the upland-inland valley continuum in Sierra Leone, occupying the lowest position in the landscape. This study aimed to analyze the actual use, constraints on the use and the agro-potential of IVS in Tonkolili District. Through interviews and limited field testing, it was possible to obtain detailed information regarding socioeconomic aspects and food production systems, as well as a rough assessment of physical properties such as soil quality and inundation period for each targeted IVS in all 11 chiefdoms in the district.

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