The role of human rights in implementing socially responsible seafood

Sustainability standards for seafood mainly address environmental performance criteria and are less concerned with the welfare of fisheries workers who produce the seafood. Yet human rights violations such as slavery and human trafficking are widespread in fisheries around the world, and underscore the need for certification bodies and other seafood supply chain actors to improve social performance, in addition to addressing environmental challenges.

Situating human rights in the context of fishing rights: Contributions and contradictions

Human rights have become a salient topic in fisheries governance. This paper clarifies key terms involved in a human rights-based approach as they pertain to fishing rights. Four conceptual tension between human rights and fishing rights are discussed. Understanding such contradictions will be important for mitigating shortcomings in practice. The authors offer a way forward to inform future implementation of human rights in the context of fishing rights allocation.

Strengthening community roles in aquatic resource governance in Uganda

Lake Victoria fisheries face severe environmental stresses. Stocks are declining in a context of increasing population and growing demand for the lake’s resources. Rising competition between users is putting conservation goals and rural livelihoods at risk. While Uganda’s co-management policy framework is well-developed, key resources for implementation are lacking, enforcement is poor, and the relations between stakeholders are unequal. Poor rural resource users face significant challenges to effectively participate in fisheries decision-making.

Building coalitions, creating change: An agenda for gender transformative research in agricultural development

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) has developed its Gender Research in Development Strategy centered on a transformative approach. Translating this strategy into actual research and development practice poses a considerable challenge, as not much (documented) experience exists in the agricultural sector to draw on, and significant innovation is required. A process of transformative change requires reflecting on multiple facets and dimensions simultaneously.

Women in fisheries activities of the Asian Fisheries Society - have they been able to make an impact?

The initiative of the Partnership for Development in Kampuchea (PADEK), in organizing a National Symposium on Women in Fisheries in Cambodia in 1994, received overwhelming support from the Government of Cambodia. This resulted in the organization of a regional seminar on the same issue involving all the countries in the Mekong Basin in 1996.

Transforming gender relations: Key to positive development outcomes in aquatic agricultural systems

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is committed to improving the food security and wellbeing of poor people who depend on freshwater and coastal ecosystems for their livelihoods. AAS is particularly concerned with enhancing the equity of the social, economic and political structures that influence the livelihoods of poor households dependent on aquatic agricultural systems.

A rights-based perspective on adaptive capacity

Whilst it is increasingly recognised that socio-political contexts shape climate change adaptation decisions and actions at all scales, current modes of development typically fail to recognise or adequately challenge these contexts where they constrain capacity to adapt. To address this failing, the authors consider how a rights-based approach broadens understanding of adaptive capacity while directing attention towards causes of exclusion and marginalisation.

Livelihoods, markets, and gender roles in Solomon Islands: case studies from Western and Isabel Provinces

Livelihoods in Solomon Islands are diverse, composed of a wide range of activities. The marketing of marine resources through value chains is an important component of this livelihood portfolio in many parts of the country. Gendered analysis of marine resource value chains can identify key entry points for equitable improvement of the livelihoods of those participating in these value chains. Case studies of two Solomon Islands communities (one each from Western and Isabel Provinces) provide insight into this issue.

Human rights approaches to governing fisheries (Editorial)

Human rights are about more than political and civil rights, they also include a bundle of “economic, social and cultural rights” which include rights to food, water, housing, and decent work, and the rights of children, migrants and women. Each of these rights has a legal framework supporting it, which forms the international architecture of human rights law.

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