Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia in Bangladesh (CSISA-BD) : Women farmers training case study update

The USAID-funded Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia in Bangladesh (CSISA-BD) project is a five-year initiative implemented through a collaboration between three CGIAR member centers, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and WorldFish. The project aims to increase household income, food security and livelihoods in impoverished and agriculturally-dependent regions of Bangladesh.

Can aquaculture benefit the extreme poor? A case study of landless and socially marginalized Adivasi (ethnic) communities in Bangladesh

The Adivasi Fisheries Project, aimed at diversifying livelihood options for resource-poor Adivasi (ethnic) communities in the North and Northwest of Bangladesh, was implemented during 2007–9. Aquaculture and related technologies were introduced to a total of 3,594 resource-poor Adivasi households. Baseline and end-line surveys were applied to assess the changes in their livelihoods following intervention.

Assessment of capabilities, needs of communities, opportunities and limitations of weather forecasting for coastal regions of Bangladesh

This report is intended to provide a range of background material in relation to Bangladesh and weather event forecasting, forecast information dissemination, and the implications of weather events and forecasting for communities and their livelihoods. It identifies where institutional efforts and funds have been, and are presently being focused, and ultimately makes some recommendations about CCAFS and WorldFish potential involvement/investment in these areas.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 7. Ecosystem services mapping

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Annual report 2017

This annual report highlights some of our key achievements over the past year as we progress towards our impact targets. In Asia and Africa, our genetic improvement program took a major step forward with the use of genomic selection tools to introduce characteristics such as disease resistance and feed efficiency into our improved tilapia strains. These are vital for ensuring the productivity and sustainability of fish farms, particularly in Africa, where aquaculture investment is critical to meet current and future food demands.

Social considerations of large river sanctuaries: A case study from the hilsa shad fishery in Bangladesh

The establishment of a sanctuary is often suggested as an effective strategy for ecological restoration, though social aspects of such attempts are often overlooked. This study analyzed the socioeconomic status of 248 fishing households who are dependent on hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) sanctuaries in southern Bangladesh.

Reimagining large-scale open-water fisheries governance through adaptive comanagement in hilsa shad sanctuaries

Almost a half million fishers in Bangladesh are predominantly reliant on the hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) fishery in the Meghna River and estuarine ecosystem. This paper adopts a broadened concept of social-ecological traps to frame the complex dynamics that emerge from social and ecological interactions in this highly natural resource-dependent social-ecological system (SES). We analyze how endogenous self-reinforcing processes in the system and poor initial conditions, particularly debt and lack of livelihood options outside fisheries, keep fishing households in poverty.

Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Cambodia

The EU and IFAD-funded Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods project (“Small Fish for Nutrition” for short) uses an integrated aquaculture/agriculture nutrition linkages approach to support poor, rural households in wetlands systems in Cambodia to improve production and productivity of small indigenous species of fish in household aquaculture ponds, and increase consumption of micronutrientrich small fish and vegetables.

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