Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to improve nutrition and livelihoods in rural Myanmar (MYNutrition)

The Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) project intends to adapt and scale up the successful innovative integrated aquaculture and fisheries/agriculture-nutrition linkages developed under the IFAD-funded Small Fish and Nutrition project in northeast and northwest rural Bangladesh in 2010-2013.

Livelihoods, markets, and gender roles in Solomon Islands: case studies from Western and Isabel Provinces

Livelihoods in Solomon Islands are diverse, composed of a wide range of activities. The marketing of marine resources through value chains is an important component of this livelihood portfolio in many parts of the country. Gendered analysis of marine resource value chains can identify key entry points for equitable improvement of the livelihoods of those participating in these value chains. Case studies of two Solomon Islands communities (one each from Western and Isabel Provinces) provide insight into this issue.

Livelihoods and poverty reduction in coastal communities in the Western Region of Ghana: Analysis of livelihoods baseline data of the ICFG Program

This report is the result of the livelihoods baseline survey as part of the USAID-funded Integrated Coastal and Fisheries Governance (ICFG) Program for the Western Region of Ghana (Hen Mpoano).

Livelihoods and fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting

Inshore marine resources play an important role in the livelihoods of Pacific Island coastal communities. However, such reliance can be detrimental to inshore marine ecosystems. Understanding the livelihoods of coastal communities is important for devising relevant and effective fisheries management strategies. This study examined livelihood considerations within fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting.

Livelihood strategies of tiger shrimp post larvae collectors in backkhali river estuary, cox’s bazar of Bangladesh

This study aim was to understand the livelihoods of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, Fabricius, 1798) post larvae collectors in the Backkhali river estuary areas under Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh during November 2010 to April 2011 where shrimp fry are caught. There are about 130-140 families and about 1000 people are living in the adjacent area. Most of the fry collectors have no land or house. They build house on Government (khas) land near the coast, the housing is mainly with earthen/bamboo or polythen.

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social-ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

A guide to mangrove rehabilitation in Solomon Islands

There are about 30 species of mangroves in Solomon Islands, representing 40% of the world’s mangrove species. They can be found on most islands and it is estimated that mangroves here cover an area of about 50 000 hectares. Mangroves are an important resource for livelihoods of rural coastal communities. However there is not an endless supply. Communities need to plan now to think about developing ways to help conserve and protect mangroves for future generations.

Gender strategy brief: A gender transformative approach to research in development in aquatic agricultural systems

In July 2011, the CGIAR approved the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in recognition of the importance of these systems and the potential they provide for reducing poverty. Our goal is to reduce poverty and improve food security for people whose livelihoods depend on aquatic agricultural systems.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Engaging the private sector to address conflict in natural resource management

International investments in agroindustry present a growing source of tension for local populations who rely on land, forests, water and fisheries for their livelihoods, particularly where local tenure security is put at risk. For governments, civil society organizations and the communities directly affected, engaging the private sector early is critical in order to avoid an escalation of conflict and to build collaboration that can yield dividends for all. Yet care must be taken to address power differences among actors and to avoid manipulation by individuals or interest groups.

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