Winners and losers in area-based management of a small-scale fishery in the Colombian Pacific

The Pacific coast of Colombia has some of the most extensive mangrove forests in South America. As an isolated region and one of the country's poorest, coastal communities rely on fishing as a main source of animal protein and income. In an attempt to reverse declining trends of fisheries resources, in 2008, an Exclusive Zone of Artisanal Fishing closed to industrial fishing, was established by stakeholders in the Northern Chocó region. Here we present a case study to investigate the effects of this area-based management on fisheries productivity and catch composition.

Supporting community-based resource management in Solomon Islands: The role of provincial governments

Rural communities in Solomon Islands rely heavily on coastal fisheries for food and income. However, coral reefs, mangroves and seagrass are degrading in many areas because of overharvesting, pollution and unsustainable land-use activities such as logging. The degradation of coastal fisheries has big implications for the food security and livelihoods of rural communities. The national government recognizes the importance of coastal fisheries and aims to ensure that 50 percent of coastal areas are sustainably managed by 2020.

Strengthening the resilience of small-scale fisheries: A modeling approach to explore the use of in-shore pelagic resources in Melanesia

Small-scale fisheries play a critical role in both poverty alleviation and food security. A large proportion of the world fish stocks are, however, getting fully or over-exploited. In this article we address these issues in the context of the small-scale fisheries of the Solomon Islands. The paper explores the extent to which in-shore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) can help increasing the resilience of the small scale fishery system and reconciling social, economic and ecological priorities.

Proceedings of the 1st Solomon Islands resource management symposium: A decade of learning

From 2 to 6 October 2017, the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM) and the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR)--in collaboration with Ecological Solutions Solomon Islands (ESSI), the Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership (SICCP), the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Program (SPREP) and WorldFish--organized the first Solomon Islands resource management symposium in Honiara.

Investing in multi-stakeholder dialogue to address natural resource competition and conflict

How can multi-stakeholder dialogue help assess and address the roots of environmental resource competition and conflict? This article summarises the outcomes and lessons from action research in large lake systems in Uganda, Zambia, and Cambodia. Dialogues linking community groups, NGOs and government agencies have reduced local conflict, produced agreements with private investors, and influenced government priorities in ways that respond to the needs of marginalised fishing communities.

Increasing social-ecological resilience within small-scale agriculture in conflict-affected Guatemala

Climate change scenarios suggest largely detrimental impacts on agricultural production from a deterioration of renewable natural resources. Over the last 15 years, a new field of research has focused on the interactions between climate and conflict risk, particularly as it relates to competition over natural resources and livelihoods. Within this field, there has been less attention to the potential for resource competition to be managed in ways that yield greater cooperation, local adaptation capacity, social-ecological resilience, and conflict mitigation or prevention.

The impact of gender blindness on social-ecological resilience: The case of a communal pasture in the highlands of Ethiopia

The authors studied how the failure to take into account gendered roles in the management of a communal pasture in the highlands of Ethiopia can affect the resilience of this social-ecological system. This paper integrates resilience analysis and gender analysis, to increase our understanding of processes that may undermine the ability of a social-ecological system to cope with, to adapt to, and to shape change.

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