Annual Report 2018

In 2018, WorldFish made notable progress toward our ambition to position fish firmly at the heart of discourse, policy and practice currently shaping the global thinking on transforming food systems, paying closer attention to nutrition and healthier diets and informing the path toward an inclusive and sustainable blue economy. Our achievements in 2018 are highlighted in this annual report.

New private GIFT hatchery in Timor-Leste boosts fish seed supply

In recent years, more and more rural households in Timor-Leste have taken up fish farming driven by increasing knowledge of a locally-tested and proven approach to growing fish and better access to quality genetically-improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) seed.

But with demand for GIFT seed continuing to outstrip supply, access to quality seed has remained a limiting factor.

Advancing Climate Smart Aquaculture Technologies (ACliSAT)

Although about 43% of the African continent is considered arid and water-poor, it supports the livelihoods of nearly 485 million people. This part of the continent is largely ignored as having potential for aquaculture development, but it has underground water sources (including brackish water aquifers), dams, seasonal ponds and pools from abandoned open-cast mines that all could be used for aquaculture. Furthermore, the abundant solar radiation is an inexpensive and sustainable source of energy for operating closed and open aquaculture systems and for preserving postharvest fish and fish products. Exploiting this potential requires research and development of climate-smart and efficient aquaculture technologies adaptable to water-deficient conditions. The ACliSAT project aims to improve rural livelihood and households’ resilience through aquaculture in Egypt, Ethiopia and Eriteria by sustainably increasing fish production and productivity, nutrition and income generation of fish farmers. The 3-year project will leverage improvements in pond designs and construction for efficient water use. It will also leverage improvements in feed production and feeding technology, as well as adaptation and improved culture practices of Nile Tilapia for different water and temperature conditions. Using these improvements, the project will stimulate growth in emerging and existing aquaculture sectors by sharing knowledge with fish farmers, research centers, extension agencies and service providers on aquaculture technologies and improving the engagement of women and youths in aquaculture activities.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems: Annual Report 2018

This annual report provides key results and learning achieved during 2018 in the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH). FISH made significant progress during the year in (a) producing and disseminating a suite of research innovations for sustainable development of aquaculture and fisheries across Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and (b) in moving toward stronger results-based program management through development and adoption of a monitoring, evaluation and learning platform.

Resources for women's agency, household food security, and women's dietary diversity in urban Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, up to 45% of the population was living in urban areas as of 2010, and the estimated prevalence of urban poverty was approximately 20%. Yet, very little is known about the food security and diets of the urban poor. To date, studies of the determinants of food security and diets in Bangladesh have focused on factors related to food systems and price shocks. Women's empowerment is one potential determinant of dietary intake that remains under-studied. In the context of global nutrition programs, interventions that promote women's empowerment are considered nutrition-sensitive.

Khokar shopno (Khoka's dream)

This story is about the change in the food intake of a young boy, Khoka, after his family started to grow fish and vegetables in a homestead pond. Khoka’s parents are poor. They do not have land to grow food even for their own consumption, nor do they earn enough to buy food from the market. Khoka was unhappy with the family’s monotonous diet. Then his father was introduced to WISH (water + fish) pond technology by Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish. This pond enables the family to grow small fish and vegetables in a portable pond that only needs 6m2 of space.

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