Socio-cultural dynamics shaping the potential of aquaculture to deliver development outcomes

There is growing appreciation of the role of aquaculture in diversifying livelihoods of the poor. However, prevailing cultural norms and values, and social relations often influence its development outcomes, which we explore in this study. Socio-cultural dynamics affect the capacity of resource-poor and marginalized groups for the adoption and retention of aquaculture technologies.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

The Role of Fish in the First 1,000 Days in Zambia

Fish is especially rich in essential omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and micronutrients, including bioavailable calcium, iron and zinc. Fish features prominently in the diet of most, especially poor, Zambians. Despite this, its significance in the diet of women and children in the first 1,000 days is not well understood. Our current knowledge of the nutrient content of commonly consumed fish species in Zambia is synthesised.

The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Sustaining healthy diets: The role of capture fisheries and aquaculture for improving nutrition in the post-2015 era

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agenda makes achieving food security and ending malnutrition a global priority. Within this framework, the importance of fisheries in local and global food systems and its contribution to nutrition and health, particularly for the poor are overlooked and undervalued. This paper reviews current fish production and consumption from capture fisheries and aquaculture, highlights opportunities for enhancing healthy diets and outlines key multi-sectoral policy solutions.

Improving diets with wild and cultivated biodiversity from across the landscape

This paper examines the literature on how biodiversity contributes to improved and diversified diets in developing countries. We assess the current state of evidence on how wild and cultivated biodiversity in all forms is related to healthy diets and nutrition, and examine how economic factors, knowledge and social norms interact with availability of biodiversity to influence both production and consumption choices.

Nutrient composition of important fish species in Bangladesh and potential contribution to recommended nutrient intakes

Fish, in Bangladesh where malnutrition remains a significant development challenge, is an irreplaceable animal-source food in the diet of millions. However, existing data on the nutrient composition of fish do not reflect the large diversity available and have focused on only a few select nutrients. The purpose of this study was to fill the gaps in existing data on the nutrient profiles of common fish in Bangladesh by analysing the proximate, vitamin, mineral and fatty acid composition of 55 fish, shrimp and prawn species from inland capture, aquaculture and marine capture fisheries.

Training manual on improved rice-fish culture and dyke cropping

Due to lack of sufficient technical knowledge and training on improved rice-fish culture which is expanding every day, many farmers are not getting optimum results in production. World Fish Center, from the start of the CSISA-BD project took the initiative to develop guideline for improved system for rice-fish culture. It was felt that there is a lack of efficient and skilled trainers and appropriate training materials.

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