Fish and the nutrition of rural Cambodians

In Cambodia, fish is a central source of food for the rural poor due to its abundance and availability, and contributes greatly to national food security. In this paper, we review how fish is a staple food, provides quality proteins and as well as essential fatty acids, and combats micronutrient deficiencies. Despite the fact that fish is highly nutritious and widely consumed in Cambodia, the Cambodian population still suffers from severe malnutrition. Children and women are specifically more prone to deficiencies.

Assessment of the carp seeds value chain in Southern Bangladesh

The Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) project implemented by World Fish and funded by USAID, aims at increasing aquaculture production in 20 districts of Southern Bangladesh (Greater Khulna, Greater Barisal, Greater Jessore and Greater Faridpur) to reduce poverty and enhance nutritional status. As part of its initial scoping activities World Fish commissioned this value chain assessment on the market chains of carp fish seed (spawn, fry and fingerlings) in the southern region of Bangladesh.

Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world

This article examines two strands of discourse on wild capture fisheries; one that focuses on resource sustainability and environmental impacts, another related to food and nutrition security and human well-being. Available data and research show that, for countries most dependent on fish to meet the nutritional requirements of their population, wild capture fisheries remain the dominant supplier.

The effect of daily consumption of the small fish Amblypharyngodon mola or added vitamin A on iron status: a randomised controlled trial among Bangladeshi children with marginal vitamin A status

Amblypharyngodon mola (mola) is a nutrient-rich, small fish found in ponds and rice fields in Bangladesh. The aim of the present intervention was to assess the effect of mola consumption on iron status in children with marginal vitamin A status.

Fish for nutrition

More than 2 billion people worldwide, particularly in developing countries, are estimated to be deficient in micronutrients, including vitamin A, iron and zinc. These vitamin and mineral deficiencies are a form of undernutrition affecting children and pregnant women. This fact sheet outlines the key benefits of eating fish, a source of micronutrients and essential acids, in alleviating nutrient deficiency.

Carp-SIS polyculture: A new intervention to improve women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition in Terai, Nepal

Based on lessons learned from field trials, carp-small indigenous fish species (SIS)-prawn polyculture technology was improved to a "carp-SIS polyculture" technology suitable for small scale farmers in Terai, Nepal. In December 2008, the project was initiated to improve income and nutrition of Tharu women in Chitwan (100 farmers) and Kailali (26 farmers) districts. The present paper presents the final results of the project.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Global and national burden of diseases and injuries among children and adolescents between 1990 and 2013: Findings from the global burden of disease 2013 study

The literature focuses on mortality among children younger than 5 years. Comparable information on nonfatal health outcomes among these children and the fatal and nonfatal burden of diseases and injuries among older children and adolescents is scarce. This study is to determine levels and trends in the fatal and nonfatal burden of diseases and injuries among younger children (aged <5 years), older children (aged 5-9 years), and adolescents (aged 10-19 years) between 1990 and 2013 in 188 countries from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 study.

Food and nutrition security in Solomon Islands

This report is a literature review on Food and Nutrition Security in Solomon Islands, based on data from surveys conducted by Solomon Islands National Statistical Office, as well as from national and international organizations working in Solomon Islands. The purpose of the report is to present information outlining the current food and nutrition situation in Solomon Islands before implementation of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS), led by WorldFish.

The benefits of aquaculture

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

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