Foods and diets of communities involved in inland aquaculture in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands has a population of just over half a million people, most of whom are rural-based subsistence farmers and fishers who rely heavily on fish as their main animal-source food and for income. The nation is one of the Pacific Island Counties and Territories; future shortfalls in fish production are projected to be serious, and government policy identifies inland aquaculture development as one of the options to meet future demand for fish.

Food and nutrition security in Timor-Leste

This report is a literature review on Food and Nutrition Security in Timor-Leste based on data from surveys conducted by the Timor-Leste National Statistics Directorate, as well as from national and international organizations working in Timor-Leste. This review was supported by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)-funded project “Strategy for Investment in Fisheries in East Timor”.

Food and nutrition security in the Barotse floodplain system

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is being implemented in ten communities in the Barotse floodplain of Zambia’s Western Province. With a focus on the rural poor and vulnerable, the AAS program aims to reduce poverty and improve food security by harnessing the development potential, productivity and diversity of aquatic and agricultural systems.

Fisheries in transition: Food and nutrition security implications for the global South

Fisheries and fish supply are undergoing a fundamental structural transition, as indicated by a ten country analysis. Aquaculture now provides around half the fish for direct human consumption and is set to grow further, but capture fisheries continue to make essential contributions to food and nutrition security throughout the global South. Capture fisheries provide diverse, nutritionally valuable fish and fish products which are often culturally preferred and easily accessed by the poor.

Fisheries and aquaculture: The importance of fish for food and nutritional security

This working paper is an attempt to distil what is known currently about the likely impacts of climate change on the commodities and natural resources that comprise the mandate of CGIAR and its 15 Centres. In this WorldFish contribution, a summary is given on the importance of fisheries and aquaculture on food nutrition and security.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish. This contributes to nutrient deficiencies and poor physical and cognitive development for children and poor health and livelihood outcomes for adults.

Baseline survey final report: Aquaculture for income and nutrition project

The World Fish Center, in collaboration with the GOB and USAID, has been implementing the FtF Aquaculture Project since October 2011 with a view to meet the government and FtF goals to sustainably reduce poverty and hunger. The project is funded by the USAID FtF initiative and covers a 5-year intervention in aquaculture focused on 20 southern districts in of the country.

Annual report 2017

This annual report highlights some of our key achievements over the past year as we progress towards our impact targets. In Asia and Africa, our genetic improvement program took a major step forward with the use of genomic selection tools to introduce characteristics such as disease resistance and feed efficiency into our improved tilapia strains. These are vital for ensuring the productivity and sustainability of fish farms, particularly in Africa, where aquaculture investment is critical to meet current and future food demands.

A behaviour change intervention with lipid-based nutrient supplements had little impact on young child feeding indicators in rural Kenya

Poor infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices are associated with linear growth faltering. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of a nutrition and water and sanitation for health intervention on three IYCF indicators-minimum dietary diversity (MDD), minimum meal frequency (MMF), and minimum acceptable diet (MAD) in Kenyan children.

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