Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Myanmar Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Symposium Proceedings

The Myanmar Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Symposium was held in Yangon on 16-17 November 2017. The event provided a unique opportunity for national and international researchers to take stock of present sectoral knowledge and jointly identify the most promising pathways for impactful fisheries and aquaculture research in Myanmar. The event was cooperatively organized by WorldFish and the Department of Fisheries (DoF) under the umbrella of the Fisheries Research Development Network (FRDN).

Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Cambodia

The EU and IFAD-funded Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods project (“Small Fish for Nutrition” for short) uses an integrated aquaculture/agriculture nutrition linkages approach to support poor, rural households in wetlands systems in Cambodia to improve production and productivity of small indigenous species of fish in household aquaculture ponds, and increase consumption of micronutrientrich small fish and vegetables.

Improving the Production, Nutrition and Market Values of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Myanmar’s Shan State and Sagaing Region (INLAND MYSAP)

Running until 2020, INLAND MYSAP supports the sustainable intensification of the small-scale freshwater aquaculture sector, improving the availability of and access to nutritious, affordable food and increasing incomes for poor and vulnerable households in four fish-deficient townships in Shan State and Sagaing Region. The project is targeting 1500 direct beneficiary households and 1500 indirect beneficiary households with its sustainable small-scale aquaculture and improved human nutrition messages.

Higher fish but lower micronutrient intakes: Temporal changes in fish consumption from capture fisheries and aquaculture in Bangladesh

This study shows people in Bangladesh are now eating 30% more fish than they did 20 years ago, but they are getting a smaller amount of important nutrients from it. The results challenge the conventional narrative that increases in food supply lead to improvements in diet and nutrition. As aquaculture becomes an increasingly important food source, it must embrace a nutrition-sensitive approach, moving beyond maximising productivity to also consider nutritional quality.

FISH: CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems: Proposal

The goal of CRP Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) is to achieve sustainable increases in the gender and socially inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to improve the livelihoods and nutrition of poor households in priority geographies. The objectives of FISH are the following: 1. Enable sustainable increases in, and gender- and socially equitable livelihood returns from, aquaculture production without creating adverse socio-economic or environmental impacts. 2.

Fish-based recipes

Appropriate and adequate dietary intake for pregnant and lactating women and also infants and young children is critical for optimal child growth and development. This booklet serves as a guide for staff from government agencies and nongovernmental organizations to integrate fish-based recipes into nutrition programs that aim to improve dietary and child feeding practices in Zambia.

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