Higher fish but lower micronutrient intakes: Temporal changes in fish consumption from capture fisheries and aquaculture in Bangladesh

This study shows people in Bangladesh are now eating 30% more fish than they did 20 years ago, but they are getting a smaller amount of important nutrients from it. The results challenge the conventional narrative that increases in food supply lead to improvements in diet and nutrition. As aquaculture becomes an increasingly important food source, it must embrace a nutrition-sensitive approach, moving beyond maximising productivity to also consider nutritional quality.

FISH: CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems: Proposal

The goal of CRP Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) is to achieve sustainable increases in the gender and socially inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to improve the livelihoods and nutrition of poor households in priority geographies. The objectives of FISH are the following: 1. Enable sustainable increases in, and gender- and socially equitable livelihood returns from, aquaculture production without creating adverse socio-economic or environmental impacts. 2.

Fish-based recipes

Appropriate and adequate dietary intake for pregnant and lactating women and also infants and young children is critical for optimal child growth and development. This booklet serves as a guide for staff from government agencies and nongovernmental organizations to integrate fish-based recipes into nutrition programs that aim to improve dietary and child feeding practices in Zambia.

Carp-mola productivity and fish consumption in small-scale homestead aquaculture in Bangladesh

Small indigenous species (SIS) of fish such as the mola carplet (Amblypharyngodon mola) are rich in nutrients, often containing high levels of zinc, iron, and vitamin A. Despite scientific and government efforts, culture of SIS for improved nutrition is not yet widespread. This paper investigates the contribution of the mola carplet, commonly referred to in Bangladesh as ‘‘mola’’ to household fish consumption, and the factors influencing productivity and income from carp–mola polyculture in southwest Bangladesh.

Training manual on household based pond aquaculture,homestead gardening and nutrition awareness

Currently many farming households face health and economic risks because of problems in malnutrition as a result of lack of knowledge and training, improved technologies and processes in farming. From the beginning of the CSISA-BD project, the World Fish Center has initiated introduction improved practices and technologies in rural farming to address malnutrition in farming households. In order to address the problem discussed, as a part of this project it has been felt there is a lack of skilled trainers and training materials.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC)

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

Promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap Region, Cambodia

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to reduce poverty and improve food security for many small-scale fishers and farmers who are dependent on aquatic agriculture systems by partnering with local, national and international partners to achieve large-scale development impact. This study on promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap region forms part of the preliminary research that informs AAS work in the highly productive Mekong Delta and Tonle Sap Lake floodplain.

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