Causes of fish depletion: a factor analysis approach

A study was conducted in 54 wetlands of 13 districts of Assam, India to evaluate the causes of fish depletion. Twenty-two variables were considered for the study. Seven factors were extracted through factor analysis (Principal Component Analysis) based on Eigen Value Criteria of more than one. These seven factors together accounted for 69.3% of the total variance. Based on the characteristics of the variables, all the factors were given descriptive names. These variables can be used to measure the extent of management deficiency of the causes of fish depletion in the wetlands.

Improving fishing incomes when resources are overfished

Despite increased evidence of overfishing of coastal and inland resources in the Indo-Pacific region, government fisheries development programmes, for the most part, retain their 'production' orientation. Using the familiar static economic model of the fishery and assuming the resource is both biologically and economically overfished, the author examines the likely impact on sustainable yields and fishing incomes of various development programmes.

Fish supply and demand scenarios in Cambodia and perspectives on the future role of aquaculture

Fish is vital to the well-being and livelihoods to millions of people in the Lower Mekong Basin, many of whom are poor, relying on fish as a major source of animal protein, sometimes the only source. The supply of ‘free’ wild fish is under threat from overfishing, climate change, habitat modification and hydro power development which could mean less fish supplied from natural sources yet at the same time more demand. Aquaculture - farming of fish and other aquatic animals - is becoming increasingly more important in supplying fish to people in the region.

Rebuilding coastal fisheries livelihoods after the Tsunami: key lessons from past experience

Fishing communities around the Indian Ocean were severely affected by the December 2004 tsunamis. Programs for rebuilding coastal fisheries livelihoods need to address the pre-tsunami situation that was characterized by overfishing and degraded natural resources. Adopting appropriate strategies to ensure sustainable livelihoods will require community involvement, as well as cross-sectoral, integrated planning and management at ascending government levels.

Seasonal trawling bans can be very successful in heavily overfished areas: the "Cyprus effect"

Seasonal trawling bans or closed seasons are among the most conventional management measures. They are more easily enforceable and, if implemented at the appropriate time of the year, usually produce good results. The purpose of ths paper is to describe a very successful experiment of this type undertaken recently in Cyprus, and the surprisingly good results draw attention to the particular usefulness of such a measure in very heavily overfished areas.

Culture of tropical sea cucumbers for stock restoration and enhancement

Severe overfishing of sea cucumbers has occurred in most countries of the tropical Indo-Pacific. The release of juveniles is being examined at the ICLARM Coastal Aquaculture Centre in the Solomon islands as a means of restoring and enhancing tropical sea cucumber stocks. Sandfish (Holothuria scabra) are the tropical species that show the best potential for stock enhancement. Sandfish are of high value, widely distributed and relatively easy to culture in simple systemss at a low cost. This paper summarizes information about the culture of H.

Small-scale fisheries in the tropics: marginality, marginalization, and some implications for fisheries management.

A brief analysis of tropical small-scale fisheries is presented, strucutured by two areas of emphasis: marginalization -actual and perceived -- and Malthusian overfishing, a concept the author proposed previously. It is suggested that marginality is, in part at least, a construction resulting from faulty mental maps, which leads to even more marginalization for small-scale fisher communities.

Coral reef fishing and coral-algal phase shifts: implications for global reef status

Coral reef fisheries support tens of millions of people, mostly in developing countries. Fishing on reefs can be classified into three stages: manageable, ecosystem-overfished, and Malthusian-overfished. Fishing with blasting devices and poisons is often associated with the third stage. Reductions in herbivory caused by overfishing may enhance the likelihood of organic pollution causing a coral–algal phase shift following major disturbances. However, cage studies indicate that reduction in herbivory can lead to the proliferation of algae even in the absence of eutrophication.

Improving fish incomes when resources are overfished.

Despite increased evidence of overfishing of coastal and inland resources in the Indo-Pacific region, government fisheries development programmes, for the most part, retain their 'production' orientation. Using the familiar static economic model of the fishery and assuming the resource is both bilogically and economically overfished, the author examines the likely impact on sustainable yields and fishing incomes of various development programmes.

A preliminary market-based analysis of the Pohnpei, Micronesia, grouper (Serranidae: Epinephelinae) fishery reveals unsustainable fishing practices.

Serranids are important components of artisanal and commercial catch worldwide, but are highly susceptible to overfishing. In Pohnpei (Micronesia), a recent coral reef fish market survey revealed a reliance on night-time spearfishing and a serranid catch composed primarily of juveniles and small adults of practically all epinepheline species. Fishing effort was concentrated in one of five municipalities and was disproportionate to the population distribution.

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