Participatory diagnosis of coastal fisheries for North Tarawa and Butaritari island communities in the Republic of Kiribati

In support of the Kiribati National Fisheries Policy 2013–2025, the ACIAR project "Improving Community-Based Fisheries Management in Pacific Island Countries" aims to develop and nurture the structures, processes and capacity to implement and sustain national programs in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

A new professionalism for agricultural research for development

There have been repeated calls for a ‘new professionalism’ for carrying out agricultural research for development since the 1990s. At the centre of these calls is a recognition that for agricultural research to support the capacities required to face global patterns of change and their implications on rural livelihoods, requires a more systemic, learning focused and reflexive practice that bridges epistemologies and methodologies.

Making sense of the market: Assessing the participatory market chain approach to aquaculture value chain development in Nepal and Bangladesh

The participatory market chain approach (PMCA) is a methodology for improving the performance of poorly-coordinated value chains. This study uses a mixed methods approach to assess the effectiveness of PMCA for promoting aquaculture value chain development in Bangladesh and Nepal. The study consists of a quantitative structured survey and two story-based qualitative methods; Most Significant Change analysis, and SenseMaker® research software.

The Landscape of leadership in environmental governance: a Case study from Solomon Islands

Sustainability science suggests a core set of factors that foster significant change in governance, with leaders and entrepreneurs often identified as the main instigators. Discussions of leadership in governance transformations often focus on key charismatic people, underplaying contestation and the complex landscape of leadership. We present an empirical study that uses a participatory network mapping approach to provide a broader examination of leadership in integrated conservation and development.

Increasing productivity and improving livelihoods in aquatic agricultural systems: a review of interventions

The doubling of global food demand by 2050 is driving resurgence in interventions for agricultural intensification. Globally, 700 million people are dependent on floodplain or coastal systems. Increased productivity in these aquatic agricultural systems is important for meeting current and future food demand. Agricultural intensification in aquatic agricultural systems has contributed to increased agricultural production, yet these increases have not necessarily resulted in broader development outcomes for those most in need.

Improving household tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) aquaculture through participatory action research

Land based aquaculture has the potential to mitigate future shortfalls of food fish supply in Solomon Islands. However, aquaculture is relatively new in the Pacific and such potential is hampered by a lack of aquaculture knowledge and practice within local cultures. A participatory action research approach was used to conduct on-farm trials with farmers in Solomon Islands to develop relevant and improved ways of farming and maximising productivity of the resident exotic tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus.

Identifying opportunities to improve governance of aquatic agricultural systems through participatory action research

Challenges of governance often constitute critical obstacles to efforts to equitably improve livelihoods in social-ecological systems. Yet, just as often, these challenges go unspoken, or are viewed as fixed parts of the context, beyond the scope of influence of agricultural, development, or natural resource management initiatives. What does it take to get governance obstacles and opportunities out in the open, creating the space for constructive dialogue and collective action that can help to address them?

Getting beneath the surface in program planning, monitoring and evaluation: Learning from use of participatory action research and theory of change in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems

Many rural poor and marginalized people strive to make a living in social-ecological systems that are characterized by multiple and often inequitable interactions across agents, scale and space. Uncertainty and inequality in such systems require research and development interventions to be adaptive, support learning and to engage with underlying drivers of poverty. Such complexity-aware approaches to planning, monitoring and evaluating development interventions are gaining strength, yet, there is still little empirical evidence of what it takes to implement them in practice.

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