The black box of power in polycentric environmental governance

Failure to address unsustainable global change is often attributed to failures in conventional environmental governance. Polycentric environmental governance—the popular alternative—involves many centres of authority interacting coherently for a common governance goal. Yet, longitudinal analysis reveals many polycentric systems are struggling to cope with the growing impacts, pace, and scope of social and environmental change. Analytic shortcomings are also beginning to appear, particularly in the treatment of power.

Gender norms and relations: implications for agency in coastal livelihoods

Improving livelihoods and livelihood opportunities is a popular thrust of development investments. Gender and other forms of social differentiation influence individual agency to access, participate in, and benefit from existing, new, or improved livelihood opportunities. Recent research illustrates that many initiatives intended to improve livelihoods still proceed as “gender blind,” failing to account for the norms and relations that will influence how women and men experience opportunities and outcomes.

Harnessing global fisheries to tackle micronutrient deficiencies

Micronutrient deficiencies account for an estimated one million premature deaths annually, and for some nations can reduce gross domestic product by up to 11%, highlighting the need for food policies that focus on improving nutrition rather than simply increasing the volume of food produced3. People gain nutrients from a varied diet, although fish—which are a rich source of bioavailable micronutrients that are essential to human health—are often overlooked.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH)

A fish agri-food system is an interconnected and interdependent system involving components of fish production through to processing, marketing and consumption. The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) is a collaborative global partnership that aims to enhance the sustainability, productivity and resilience of fish agri-food systems, contributing to global goals for poverty reductions, food and nutrition security, and improved resilience of natural resource systems.

Annual Report 2018

In 2018, WorldFish made notable progress toward our ambition to position fish firmly at the heart of discourse, policy and practice currently shaping the global thinking on transforming food systems, paying closer attention to nutrition and healthier diets and informing the path toward an inclusive and sustainable blue economy. Our achievements in 2018 are highlighted in this annual report.

Colorimetric assay for the in vitro evaluation of Saprolegniabiofilm inhibitors

Oomycete infections caused by Saprolegnia species represent an escalating problem in sustainable aquaculture development. This could be attributed to the ban of Malachite green and other carcinogenic agents aims at killing the pathogen. The increase in the incidence of saprolegniosis could also be attributed to its ability to form biofilms. In this study, the authors have investigated the effects of propionic acid (PPA) on reducing the viability of induced Saprolegnia biofilms using colorimetric MTS assay based on the reduction of tetrazolium salts.

Resources for women's agency, household food security, and women's dietary diversity in urban Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, up to 45% of the population was living in urban areas as of 2010, and the estimated prevalence of urban poverty was approximately 20%. Yet, very little is known about the food security and diets of the urban poor. To date, studies of the determinants of food security and diets in Bangladesh have focused on factors related to food systems and price shocks. Women's empowerment is one potential determinant of dietary intake that remains under-studied. In the context of global nutrition programs, interventions that promote women's empowerment are considered nutrition-sensitive.

Why antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture systems matters for the One Health approach

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when bacteria change and become resistant to antibiotics used to treat the infections they cause. The interconnected nature of agri-food systems means that AMR can spread, posing a major threat to public and animal health as well as the structure and sustainability of food production. One Health recognizes this interconnectedness as well as the need to apply a collaborative, multisectoral and transdisciplinary approach. WorldFish is partnering with Cefas and the University of Exeter to carry out study and research on AMR on pond culture.

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