Multiple water use as an approach for increased basin productivity and improved adaptation: a case study from Bangladesh

This study, supported by the Challenge Program Water and Food (CPWF-Project 35), demonstrates the case of multiple-use of water through seasonal aquaculture interventions for improved rice–fish production systems in the Bangladesh floodplains. The project focused on community-based fish culture initiatives, increasingly adopted in the agro-ecological zones of the major floodplains of the Padma, Testa, and Brahmaputra basin. The productivity of water and fish is used as an indicator to explain this case.

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social-ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

Engaging the private sector to address conflict in natural resource management

International investments in agroindustry present a growing source of tension for local populations who rely on land, forests, water and fisheries for their livelihoods, particularly where local tenure security is put at risk. For governments, civil society organizations and the communities directly affected, engaging the private sector early is critical in order to avoid an escalation of conflict and to build collaboration that can yield dividends for all. Yet care must be taken to address power differences among actors and to avoid manipulation by individuals or interest groups.

Does aquaculture add resilience to the global food system?

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector and continues to expand alongside terrestrial crop and livestock production. Using portfolio theory as a conceptual framework, the authors explore how current interconnections between the aquaculture, crop, livestock, and fisheries sectors act as an impediment to, or an opportunity for, enhanced resilience in the global food system given increased resource scarcity and climate change.

Adapting tropical Pacific fisheries and aquaculture to climate change: management measures, policies and investments

The main purpose of this book is to assess how changes projected to occur under low (B1) and high (A2) emissions scenarios in 2035 and 2100 could derail plans by the Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) to use the sustainable benefits of fisheries and aquaculture to foster economic development, government revenue, food security and livelihoods.

Testing resilience thinking in a poverty context: experience from the Niger River basin

Resilience thinking is an important addition to the range of frameworks and approaches that can be used to understand and manage complex social–ecological systems like small-scale fisheries. However, it is yet to lead to better environmental or development outcomes for fisheries stakeholders in terms of food security, improved livelihoods and ecological sustainability.

Should enhanced resilience be an objective of natural resource management research for developing countries

Productivity enhancement has traditionally been the main focus of agricultural research to alleviate poverty and enhance food security of poor farmers in the developing world. Recently, the harmful impact of climate change, economic volatility, and other external shocks on poor farmers has led to concern that resilience should feature alongside productivity as a major objective of research.

Shocks, recovery trajectories and resilience among aquaculture-dependent households in post-tsunami Aceh, Indonesia

Aquaculture-dependent households in Bireuen District, Aceh, Indonesia, have in recent years endured repeated, diverse shocks; multiple economic shocks, shrimp disease, civil war and the 2004 Asian tsunami. Following the tsunami, extensive international aid efforts were directed at aquaculture pond rehabilitation. Yet, the pitfalls of simply recreating a system that was run down, underperforming and environmentally damaging due to the ongoing effects of multiple previous shocks are clear.

Medium term plan 2010-2012

This Medium-Term Plan (MTP) sets out the WorldFish Center response for harnessing fisheries and aquaculture to help address the global issue of food shortage and poverty by addressing two key development challenges: i) expanding sustainable aquaculture, and ii) ensuring productive and resilient small-scale fisheries. The MTP is developed around six major areas: 1. Global drivers of change 2. Markets and trade 3. Multi-level and multi sectoral governance 4. Improving sustainable aquaculture technologies 5. Aquaculture and the environment 6.

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