Vertical agriculture: Suspended horticulture in towers

The farmers of Bangladesh face many challenges associated with climate change and increases in population. Rising salinity, waterlogging, flooding and storm surges, coupled with a growing population that is expected to reach 250 million people by the year 2050, have resulted in a decrease in cultivable land for vegetable production. This brief descirbes how vertical agriculture can address the loss of cultivable land by maximizing the space around households and suspending horticulture production along trees, houses and bamboo structures.

Collaborating for resilience: conflict, collective action, and transformation on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake

Tha authors report on outcomes and lessons learned from a 15-month initiative in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake. Employing the appreciation-influence-control (AIC) model of participatory stakeholder engagement, the initiative built shared understanding of the sources of vulnerability in fisheries livelihoods and catalyzed collective action to support resilience in this valuable and productive social-ecological system.

Ecosystem-based management objectives for the North Sea: riding the forage fish rollercoaster

The North Sea provides a useful model for considering forage fish (FF) within ecosystem-based management as it has a complex assemblage of FF species. This paper is designed to encourage further debate and dialogue between stakeholders about management objectives. Changing the management of fisheries on FF will have economic consequences for all fleets in the North Sea. The predators that are vulnerable to the depletion of FF are Sandwich terns, great skua and common guillemots, and to a lesser extent, marine mammals.

Alleviating poverty through aquaculture: progress, opportunities and improvements

Significant changes in our understanding of the interrelationships between aquaculture and poverty have occurred in the last decade. In particular, there is a growing realization that the impacts of aquaculture need to be assessed from a value-chain perspective rather than through a narrow production focus. In recent years, understandings of poverty and the forms, outcomes and importance of aquaculture have also shifted. Terms in current use are first clarified, including those related to scale and location of aquaculture.

Common-pool resources, livelihoods, and resilience: critical challenges for governance in Cambodia

Common-pool resource management is a critical element in the interlocked challenges of food security, nutrition, poverty reduction, and environmental sustainability. This paper examines strategic policy choices and governance challenges facing Cambodia‘s forests and fisheries, the most economically important subsectors of agriculture that rely on common-pool resources. It then outlines policy priorities for institutional development to achieve improvements in implementing these goals.

Strengthening governance across scales in aquatic agricultural systems

Aquatic agricultural systems in developing countries face increasing competition from multiple stakeholders operating from local to national and regional scales over rights to access and use natural resources—land, water, wetlands, and fisheries—essential to rural livelihoods. A key implication is the need to strengthen governance to enable equitable decision-making amidst such competition, building capacities for resilience and transformations that reduce poverty.

Strengthening collective action to address resource conflict in Lake Kariba, Zambia

Where natural resources are a key component of the rural economy, the ability of the poor to realize their visions for the future depends significantly on institutional structures that govern resource access and management. This case study reports on an initiative on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zambia, where lakeshore residents face competition over fishing, tourism, and commercial aquaculture.

Vertical agriculture: Homestead horticulture suspended in sacks

Suspending horticulture in sacks above the ground can result in higher levels of productivity for vegetables when the challenges of unfertile or saline soil, flooding, waterlogging, and land and water constraints are regularly encountered. Previously used feed and fertilizer sacks are filled with a high-productivity soil mixture. Vegetables are grown on the top and/or in holes cut into the sides of the sacks. While growing vegetables in sacks has existed for many years in Bangladesh, the technique has been modified by WorldFish in collaboration with farmer researchers.

Restocking, stock enhancement, and sea ranching: arenas of progress

There are concerns about the sustainability of the world’s capture fisheries at the current total level of ~96 million tons per year. The warning signals are an increase in the proportion of depleted or recovering stocks, from about 10% in 1974 to 28% in 2004, and a corresponding decrease of under- to moderately exploited stocks from about 40% to 24%. It is widely acknowledged that reductions in fishing effort and restoration of fish habitats are needed to improve resilience of capture fisheries.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Resilience