Giant freshwater prawn culture: Experiences from on-farm trials in the Philippines

This study explored the viability of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii, locally known as ulang) culture in six regions in the Philippines. Twelve farmer-cooperators employed ulang monoculture and eight employed ulang-tilapia polyculture. In Region 8, all farmer-cooperators conducted both monoculture and polyculture systems. This paper is focused on comparing ulang monoculture and ulang-tilapia polyculture.

Foods and diets of communities involved in inland aquaculture in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands has a population of just over half a million people, most of whom are rural-based subsistence farmers and fishers who rely heavily on fish as their main animal-source food and for income. The nation is one of the Pacific Island Counties and Territories; future shortfalls in fish production are projected to be serious, and government policy identifies inland aquaculture development as one of the options to meet future demand for fish.

Fish ring microhabitats: Resilience in rice field fisheries

A habitat is the environment where species such as fish live, feed and breed. A small, specialized area of a habitat (a microhabitat) can be created and managed as a way to attract and encourage a species to use the environment. These microhabitats help maintain the biodiversity of ecosystems, which in turn support livelihood activities and the production of food. This brief describes the use of fish ring microhabitat developed by WorldFish for use in rice fields in Bangladesh and its benefit.

Effects of white spot disease and bio-security on shrimp farming in Bangladesh

Shrimp culture is of central importance in Bangladesh, shrimp being the cash component of many smallholder, polyculture fish farming systems. Shrimp also contributes substantial income through exports. However, production remains low compared with other countries for a number of reasons, including low availability of good quality post larvae (PL) seed stock, lack of credit facilities, and disease problems.

Community water access, availability and management in the Tonle Sap region, Cambodia

During the rollout of CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in Tonle Sap in 2013, water management was highlighted as one of the key development challenges. With limited capacity to regulate water, the situation oscillates between too much water in the wet season and too little water in the dry season.

Community based fish culture in the public and private floodplains of Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. This research aimed to understand the complex institutional relations that govern ownership, access, and control of the floodplains under Community Based Fish Culture (CBFC) to increase fish production and overall livelihoods of the poor.

Climate-smart house: Housing that is cyclone resistant and food, energy and water efficient in Bangladesh

Since cyclones Sidr (2007) and Aila (2009), communities in southern Bangladesh have increasingly needed to protect their homes and livelihoods from destructive natural disasters. WorldFish embarked on a climate-resilient housing project in 2013, building a prototype climate-smart house that is resilient to cyclones and is also water, food, energy and space efficient. This brief describes how the climate-smart house provides protection against cyclones and flooding and supports efficient use of water and energy.

Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia in Bangladesh (CSISA-BD) : Women farmers training case study update

The USAID-funded Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia in Bangladesh (CSISA-BD) project is a five-year initiative implemented through a collaboration between three CGIAR member centers, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and WorldFish. The project aims to increase household income, food security and livelihoods in impoverished and agriculturally-dependent regions of Bangladesh.

Building climate-resilient food systems for Pacific Islands

The countries and territories of the Pacific Islands face many challenges in building the three main pillars of food security: availability, access and appropriate use of nutritious food. These challenges arise from factors including rapid population growth and urbanization, shortages of arable land for farming and the availability of cheap, low-quality foods. As a result, many are now highly dependent on imported food, and the incidence of non-communicable diseases in the region is among the highest in the world.

Asset or liability? Aquaculture in a natural disaster prone area

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of aquaculture in improving a family's ability to cope with disasters like cyclones. Small-scale aquaculture is expanding in deltas globally. This work, therefore, seeks to better understand the role of such household assets in one particularly vulnerable region; coastal Bangladesh. Benefits and the potential contribution of aquaculture towards surviving after a catastrophe are explored.

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