Biosecurity in tilapia production

A presentation given at The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) held the 4th Global Conference on Aquatic Animal Health from 2 to 4 April 2019, in Santiago, Chile. Tilapia is very important for food and nutrition security, livelihoods and income for rural households in Asia and Africa. Importance attached to biosecurity and health management must be at the same level as for shrimps and salmon. This calls for a massive change in the way farmers, researchers and policy makers treat carps and tilapia with respect to overall biosecurity and health management.

Opportunities and challenges for small-scale aquaculture in Zambia

This study, funded by the German government and in partnership with an international research institute as well as the government department responsible for fish farming in Zambia, collected quantitative and qualitative data that aimed to provide a holistic view of the livelihoods of smallholder fish farmers in the country. A total of 151 fish farming households were surveyed and an additional 46 qualitative interviews were collected with a selected variety of fish farmers.

New private GIFT hatchery in Timor-Leste boosts fish seed supply

In recent years, more and more rural households in Timor-Leste have taken up fish farming driven by increasing knowledge of a locally-tested and proven approach to growing fish and better access to quality genetically-improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) seed.

But with demand for GIFT seed continuing to outstrip supply, access to quality seed has remained a limiting factor.

Capacitating Farmers and Fishers to Manage Climate Risks in South Asia (CaFFSA)

Climate variability has a profound influence on fisheries and agriculture in South Asia. CaFFSA will innovate in the delivery of climate services to 330,000 farm households in India (Andhra Pradesh and Odisha states) and 150,000 fish farming households in Odisha and Bangladesh (Barisal, Sylhet and Khulna divisions). Timely, reliable and contextualized climate information will profoundly change the climate risk equation in sectors that underpin the food security of millions. The project will build on the existing expertise of CGIAR and partnerships with national agencies, agricultural service and credit institutions to design and deliver scalable products, with an aim to reach more than 600,000 people by 2021.

This work was implemented as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is carried out with support from CGIAR Fund Donors and through bilateral funding agreements. This project is led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems: Annual Report 2018

This annual report provides key results and learning achieved during 2018 in the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH). FISH made significant progress during the year in (a) producing and disseminating a suite of research innovations for sustainable development of aquaculture and fisheries across Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and (b) in moving toward stronger results-based program management through development and adoption of a monitoring, evaluation and learning platform.

Tekshoyi unnoyon e service provision model (Service provision model in sustainable development)

This story describes the service provision model introduced by WorldFish through the Improving Food Security and Livelihoods project. The model focuses on local service providers (LSP) and service provider associations (SPAs), which act as a bridge between poor producers, private sector entities and government agencies. SPAs help the poor to enter and benefit from markets. Each LSP organizes input and output market support for around ten groups of 20–25 farming households.

Shomirer upolobdhi (Shomir's enlightenment)

This story describes the impact of agrochemical use in aquaculture. Shomir was spending a lot of money to buy multiple chemicals and medicines recommended by different local sales agents, without knowing why they were needed or how to apply them. In addition, the chemicals were not increasing his fish production as he expected, and he noticed they made his skin itch. Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish, told him about a training course for fish farmers. The course taught him about best management practices and the correct use of chemicals in his pond.

Rajur shofolota (Raju's success)

This story describes Raju’s adoption of best farming practices. He was following conventional farming methods but did not have enough capital to intensify his production and was disappointed with his annual profit. Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish, told him how to fatten overwintered carp and prawn at low density and low input and get faster growth. By following Ali’s advice, he found that he did not need to spend a lot of money on feed because he was stocking less fish. He was also able to pay for the feed with his own money until they became a marketable size.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Small-scale aquaculture