Guidelines for community fish refuge-rice field fisheries system management in Cambodia (Khmer version)

These guidelines are a summary of a full manual for Community Fish Refuge (CFR) - Rice Field Fisheries (RFF) system management in Cambodia. The aim of these guidelines is to document good practices in CFR-RFF system management, and thus act as a resource for organizational stakeholders wishing to support fish conservation, food security and nutrition in such environments.

Guidelines for community fish refuge-rice field fisheries system management in Cambodia

These guidelines are a summary of a full manual for Community Fish Refuge (CFR) - Rice Field Fisheries (RFF) system management in Cambodia. The aim of these guidelines is to document good practices in CFR-RFF system management, and thus act as a resource for organizational stakeholders wishing to support fish conservation, food security and nutrition in such environments.

A manual for community fish refuge-rice field fisheries system management in Cambodia

This manual is based on findings from the implementation of the USAID-funded Rice Field Fisheries Enhancement Project (RFFEP) in four provinces of Cambodia (Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Pursat and Battambang) between 2012 and 2016. The manual has been developed to guide relevant stakeholders and target communities in how to approach i) the selection of Community Fish Refuges (CFR) and ii) the process of designing and implementing improvements to the CFRs.

Opportunities and challenges for small-scale aquaculture in Zambia

This study, funded by the German government and in partnership with an international research institute as well as the government department responsible for fish farming in Zambia, collected quantitative and qualitative data that aimed to provide a holistic view of the livelihoods of smallholder fish farmers in the country. A total of 151 fish farming households were surveyed and an additional 46 qualitative interviews were collected with a selected variety of fish farmers.

Feeding both pond and fish: A pathway to ecological intensification of aquaculture systems

The nutritious pond concept is a novel approach that enables the pond itself to contribute significantly to the diet of the farmed fish/shrimp. Our research shows that feeding the pond by balancing the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio can increase the contribution of naturally occurring food in the diets of the cultured animals, thus enhancing reliance and reducing production costs and environmental impact. Field trials are currently being conducted in Vietnam and Bangladesh to better understand nutrient transfer in aquaculture ponds.

Improving Food Security and Livelihoods of Poor Farming Households (IFSL)

The Improving Food Security and Livelihoods of Poor Farming Households (IFSL) project aims to assist 180,000 smallholder farmers in Bangladesh by improving access to appropriate technical advice and affordable inputs as well as business and marketing support. The project builds on the proven concept of Local Service Providers (LSPs). LSPs are lead farmers who live in communities close to farmers and are selected by target communities and other stakeholders to become their advisors and provide marketing support. Through the project, WorldFish promotes improved fish and shrimp farming techniques as well as mixed cropping systems involving LSPs and farmers groups. It also promotes the adoption of improved fish and shrimp farming techniques, which builds on its ongoing R&D work.

Related Publications


Shomirer upolobdhi (Shomir's enlightenment)

Rajur shofolota (Raju's success)

Khokar shopno (Khoka's dream)

Chaaper pona (Overwintered fry)

Tekshoyi unnoyon e service provision model (Service provision model in sustainable development)

 

 


Flood loss assessment and risk management plan for aquaculture and agriculture in South West Bangladesh

Identifying suitable carp and prawn nursing practices under changing environmental cycle and developing their business model by linking with market and farmers

Health management practices and occupational health hazards in shrimp and prawn farming in South West Bangladesh
   

 

 

Tekshoyi unnoyon e service provision model (Service provision model in sustainable development)

This story describes the service provision model introduced by WorldFish through the Improving Food Security and Livelihoods project. The model focuses on local service providers (LSP) and service provider associations (SPAs), which act as a bridge between poor producers, private sector entities and government agencies. SPAs help the poor to enter and benefit from markets. Each LSP organizes input and output market support for around ten groups of 20–25 farming households.

Shomirer upolobdhi (Shomir's enlightenment)

This story describes the impact of agrochemical use in aquaculture. Shomir was spending a lot of money to buy multiple chemicals and medicines recommended by different local sales agents, without knowing why they were needed or how to apply them. In addition, the chemicals were not increasing his fish production as he expected, and he noticed they made his skin itch. Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish, told him about a training course for fish farmers. The course taught him about best management practices and the correct use of chemicals in his pond.

Rajur shofolota (Raju's success)

This story describes Raju’s adoption of best farming practices. He was following conventional farming methods but did not have enough capital to intensify his production and was disappointed with his annual profit. Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish, told him how to fatten overwintered carp and prawn at low density and low input and get faster growth. By following Ali’s advice, he found that he did not need to spend a lot of money on feed because he was stocking less fish. He was also able to pay for the feed with his own money until they became a marketable size.

Khokar shopno (Khoka's dream)

This story is about the change in the food intake of a young boy, Khoka, after his family started to grow fish and vegetables in a homestead pond. Khoka’s parents are poor. They do not have land to grow food even for their own consumption, nor do they earn enough to buy food from the market. Khoka was unhappy with the family’s monotonous diet. Then his father was introduced to WISH (water + fish) pond technology by Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish. This pond enables the family to grow small fish and vegetables in a portable pond that only needs 6m2 of space.

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