Fish farmers’ perceptions, impacts and adaptation on/of/to climate change in Africa (The case of Egypt and Nigeria)

Perception is the bed rock to really apprehend the assertiveness and interpretations of the farmers which are the grass root receptors or benefactors of the effects of climate change. Individual perception and knowledge on climate change varies according to geographical location, occupation, political and socio-economics, ecological, cultural background of the entity. Empirical observations and climate models both indicate that global climate and ocean conditions have been changing over the last 100 years and will likely change more rapidly in the future.

Aquaculture without borders: Most significant change stories from the Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project in Bangladesh and Nepal

The European Union-supported Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project (ANEP) began in Bangladesh and Nepal in December 2011 and ended in November 2014. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve the food security and nutrition of smallholders by facilitating the adoption of productive and environmentally sustainable agricultural technologies that improve beneficiaries’ livelihoods; and (2) create and develop market links to improve food and nutritional security of both rural producers and urban consumers in Bangladesh and Nepal.

Focal community profiles for Barotse Hub, Zambia.

The purpose of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) focal community profiles is to provide basic descriptions of initial conditions in each community where AAS works in the Barotse Floodplain (the Barotse Hub) in Zambia’s Western Province. This information will contribute to, among other things, (i) evaluating change through future benchmarking activities; (ii) developing hub-specific panel research designs to answer program and initiative research questions; and (iii) strengthening current community engagement processes.

Reuse of fish pond sediments as fertilizer for fodder grass production in Bangladesh: Potential for sustainable intensification and improved nutrition

Intensive aquaculture systems (e.g. pangasius farming) make important contributions to food security in developing countries, including Bangladesh, but are associated with a variety of negative environmental impacts, including the discharge of nutrient rich sediments into local ecosystems.

The case of rice-fish farmer Mang Isko from Dasmarifias, Cavite, Philippines

This primer aims to give decisionmakers in governmental and non-governmental organizations and in other organizations concerned with agriculture and rural development an overview and a basis for understanding the principles of IAA, and to help them decide whether to embark on IAA activities and include these in their program portfolio.The case of a rice-fish farmer in Cavite Philippines was described.

Increasing fish farm profitability through aquaculture best management practice training in Egypt

Egyptian aquaculture production has grown rapidly to over one million tons per year so that it now provides most of the country's fish supply. However, Egyptian fish farmers have received little extension advice or training. An intervention starting in 2012 aimed to address this gap by providing best management practice (BMP) training for pondbased tilapia monoculture and tilapia-mullet polyculture fish farmers.

Who says women can’t fish? Stories of successful women farmers in Bangladesh and Nepal

This booklet present several stories of women in rural Bangladesh and Nepal who are making positive changes in their communities. The stories have been collected from a variety of projects WorldFish has been implementing over the past nine years with support from partners and donors. These inspirational women have undertaken new agriculture-aquaculture livelihood opportunities to better their lives and those of their family members. To get where they are now, these women have had to overcome many challenges.

How do hunter-gatherers learn? The transmission of indigenous knowledge among the Agta of the Philippines

The Agta of the Philippines depend on extensive knowledge of their natural environment for their livelihoods. However, little is known about the transmission of this indigenous ecological knowledge. This paper examines the transmission of knowledge on hunting, fishing and gathering among the Agta in San Mariano, Isabela Province. We used observation, interviewing and knowledge tests as methods of inquiry. Our results show that knowledge transmission happens on-site, is gender-specific and that pathways of knowledge transmission differ per livelihood activity.

Promoting multi-stakeholder contributions to international cooperation on sustainable solutions for aquaculture development in South-East Asia

The European Union is the world’s largest importer of seafood products, mainly from Asia. The growth of aquaculture in Asia has been remarkable, but it also raises environmental concerns and poses serious challenges in terms of sustainability, social equity and suitable technologies. To establish sustainable aquaculture practices that improve resource efficiency and reduce environmental impact, the project will establish standards for aquaculture site planning, animal health, food product safety and farm governance. A key aim is to launch a multi-stakeholder platform—the European-Asian Technology and Innovation Platform—to foster international cooperation on sustainable aquaculture between Europe and South-East Asia.

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