Gender inequalities in access to and benefits derived from the natural fishery in the Barotse Floodplain, Zambia, Southern Africa

People living in and around the Barotse Floodplain are some of the poorest in Zambia due to many factors restricting their abilities to engage in activities to secure food and income. Women, and in particular resident women, are especially constrained given certain gender norms and power relations that hamper them from accessing and adequately benefiting from the natural fishery. Resident women typically rely on other, less remunerative means to secure their livelihoods.

Gender differences in willingness to pay for capital-intensive agricultural technologies: the case of fish solar tent dryers in Malawi

In this paper, we analyse Lake Malawi fish processors’ Willingness to pay (WTP) and identify the gender disparities that are associated with the WTP for a common good, i.e. investing in a group owned fish solar tent dryer (FSTD). We assessed the willingness to pay for group ownership of FSTD because we assumed that the initial investments are too high for individual fish processors to bear.

FISH: CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems: Proposal

The goal of CRP Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) is to achieve sustainable increases in the gender and socially inclusive production and equitable distribution of nutritious fish to improve the livelihoods and nutrition of poor households in priority geographies. The objectives of FISH are the following: 1. Enable sustainable increases in, and gender- and socially equitable livelihood returns from, aquaculture production without creating adverse socio-economic or environmental impacts. 2.

Empirical yield-effort models for Bangladesh inland fisheries

This paper aims to support community-based fisheries management (CBFM) of inland fisheries resources in Bangladesh. An investigation into the impact of the nationwide CBFM Project and four alternative yield-effort models were fitted to the catch (yield) and effort data. The study comprised community managed fisheries (sites) located in five different inland water habitat types in Bangladesh for the period 1997-2005.

Socioeconomics and small-scale fisheries

Socioeconomic aspects of small-scale fisheries in southeast Asia are considered. Income levels in fisheries were generally found to be lower than comparable groups within the same community. Country differences occurred and some of the factors responsible for these income differences include: 1) type of gear and how it is used; 2) marketing structures; 3) race, religion or caste; 4) government programmes; and 5) introduction of aquaculture. It is believed that further research and information are required for the industry.

Socioeconomic assessment of marine fisheries of Thailand

Thailand is currently one of the ten largest fishing nations in the world. In 1996, fish production reached 3.7 million t with 90% of the production coming from the marine fisheries sector and 10% from inland fisheries. Thai fishing operates in four fishing grounds namely, the Gulf of Thailand, the Andaman Sea, the South China Sea and the Bay of Bengal. However with the establishment of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in 1977, Thailand lost over 300 000 km2 of traditional fishing grounds.

A socioeconomic and bioeconomic analysis of coastal fisheries of Bangladesh

Bangladesh has an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of 164 000 km2 and a continental shelf area of 66 440 km2. Artisanal (small scale) fisheries extend from the coast to 40 m while industrial (commercial scale) fisheries operate beyond 40 m depth. The coastal fisheries of Bangladesh exploit a complex multi-species resource. There are 18 demersal and pelagic species, seven species of larger pelagic and 10 shrimp species that are commercially important among the fishes exploited.

The role of fisheries sector in the coastal fishing communities of Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is an island country with a land area of 65 610 km2. With the declaration of the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in 1976, the country gained sovereign rights over an ocean area of 536 000 km2 and EEZ extending from 24 to 200 nm. The continental shelf is about 26 000 km2 with an average width of around 22 km, and the coastline is 1 100 km long. The total annual fish production of Sri Lanka was 25 000 t in 1952 and 269 850 t in 1998. Major fish species caught in Sri Lankan waters are skipjack, blood fish, yellow fin tuna, mullet, shark, trevally, Spanish mackerel, prawns, lobsters.

Resilience and social thresholds in small-scale fishing communities

Change has become a pervasive global force with implications for the sustainability of social–ecological systems. In this context, understanding how much disturbance systems can absorb, where critical thresholds lie, and what systems might look like if a threshold is crossed are critical research questions. This paper explores resilience and social thresholds in two coastal communities in Mozambique by having fishers define their system identity, identify potential system thresholds, and explain how they would respond to crossing a threshold.

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species caught and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Interviews were conducted among 60 fishermen between February and March 2010. Economic assessment of small-scale fishing activities were done using questionnaires based on direct market pricing and contingent valuation methods.

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