FISH events: Visioning for a Learning Hub of Excellence

WorldFish researchers from Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and partner organization, James Cook University are meeting next week at the Nusa Tupe Research Station in Western Province of Solomon Islands.

For 20 years, WorldFish research in the Solomon Islands has sought to improve the performance of fisheries and aquaculture for food security and human wellbeing. Insights from this work are shared across the Pacific region.

Situating human rights in the context of fishing rights: Contributions and contradictions

Human rights have become a salient topic in fisheries governance. This paper clarifies key terms involved in a human rights-based approach as they pertain to fishing rights. Four conceptual tension between human rights and fishing rights are discussed. Understanding such contradictions will be important for mitigating shortcomings in practice. The authors offer a way forward to inform future implementation of human rights in the context of fishing rights allocation.

Our Ocean 2019

Learning, Sharing, Acting

The oceans are under threat from the effects of climate change, pollution, loss of biodiversity and unsustainable use. Our future depends on clean and healthy oceans, where production and protection go hand in hand. At the sixth Our Ocean conference, to be held in Oslo in October, it will highlight the importance of knowledge as the basis of human actions and policies to ensure sustainable future economic growth.

Special events: 2nd Expert Group Meeting

High-level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy

The 2nd Expert Group Meeting which will take place in Abu Dhabi is a unique group of world leaders committed to developing, catalyzing and supporting solutions for ocean health and wealth in policy, governance, technology and finance.

WorldFish Honorary Fellow Eddie Allison has been invited to join the 2nd Expert Group Meeting of the High-level Panel.

Strengthening and scaling community-based approaches to Pacific coastal fisheries management in support of the New Song

In the small island developing states of the Pacific, catching, trading and eating fish are central to the way of life and local and national economies. Local and external pressures on marine resources, and high reliance on fisheries as a livelihood, mean that improving and sustaining fisheries benefits is a key pathway to improve human wellbeing and contribute to food and nutrition security. This project aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more resilient fisheries as a foundation. The project contributes to the Pacific Community's New Song strategy, which calls for a stronger, co-ordinated approach to developing and managing coastal fisheries. The project aims to: (1) strengthen Pacific institutions to implement the New Song for coastal fisheries; (2) improve and scale out CBFM in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; (3) improve the opportunities, viability and performance of livelihoods in support of CBFM initiatives; (4) increase social and gender equity in coastal fisheries governance, utilization and benefit distribution; and (5) promote food and nutrition security in the Pacific food system through improved management and use of fish. The project builds on community-based management and multi-level governance efforts in preceding projects led by WorldFish with national and regional partners.

Global conference: Towards an inclusive blue economy

International Institute for Environmental and Development (IIED) will host an international event to discuss how to develop a marine economy that is fair and sustainable that will bring together ocean experts, policymakers, fisheries associations, business and civil society representatives and stakeholders to consider strategies for developing national economies that protect marine resources and people's livelihoods and make sure that the benefits of the ocean are shared equitably.

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