Farming Waters, Changing Lives

Climate change, sea level rise, increased salinity; these are some of the challenges to development in Bangladesh. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is working in Bangladesh to help small-scale fish farmers improve their lives through better farming practices.

Traditionally Bangladeshi women are looked down on if they work the ponds, but this hasn't deterred Banlata Das from grabbing the chance to lift her family out of poverty.

Valuation of tropical river resources to promote management and governance

Tropical rivers provide food and a means of livelihood for millions of the world’s poor, but there is a lack of information on how to place a monetary and economic value on this resource.

This information gap means that the need to protect river ecosystems may not be fully appreciated, especially in the face of infrastructure projects such as dams and irrigation schemes that can seriously affect water flow and fish habitats.

Promoting small-scale aquaculture for food security and nutrition in Africa and Asia

Bina Roy lives in rural Bangladesh. She is a wife, mother, a farmer and a fisher. Bina is also secretary to the committee that oversees fishing practices in her village. In 2002, she and her neighbors began implementing several new aquaculture practices to boost farmed fish production. The result: fish production increased by 20%  and the improved practices have spread to 1,200 villages across Bangladesh's lowland floodplains, and are now yielding more than 1,200 tons of fish each year and generating nearly US$1 million in additional income.

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