Proceedings of the 1st Solomon Islands resource management symposium: A decade of learning

From 2 to 6 October 2017, the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology (MECDM) and the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR)--in collaboration with Ecological Solutions Solomon Islands (ESSI), the Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership (SICCP), the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Program (SPREP) and WorldFish--organized the first Solomon Islands resource management symposium in Honiara.

Porter un nouvel éclairage sur les captures non visibles: La contribution de la pêche artisanale au développement durable

En 2012, la FAO, la Banque mondiale et WorldFish ont publié une étude Hidden Harvest: The global contribution of capture fisheries. Pour soutenir la dynamique croissante de mise en oeuvre des Directives SSF, et en réponse aux Objectifs de développement durable, la FAO, WorldFish et l’Université Duke travaillent en partenariat avec des experts du monde entier pour revisiter et développer la problématique à partir de cette première étude Hidden Harvest.

Policy coherence with the small-scale fisheries guidelines: Analysing across scales of governance in Pacific small-scale fisheries

Concerns about the sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and the equitable distribution of fisheries benefits, are wide-spread within government agencies, non-government organizations, and rural fishing communities throughout Pacific Island Countries and Territories. Addressing these concerns was given renewed impetus in recent years with the completion and adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines). This global document enters a complex policy landscape within the Pacific region.

Non-farmed fish contribute to greater micronutrient intakes than farmed fish: results from an intra-household survey in rural Bangladesh

Fish is the most important animal-source food (ASF) in Bangladesh, produced from capture fisheries (non-farmed) and aquaculture (farmed) sub-sectors. Large differences in micronutrient content of fish species from these sub-sectors exist. The aims of the present paper are to describe the importance of fish in the diets of vulnerable groups in comparison to other ASF, and the contribution of species from non-farmed and farmed sources to nutrient intakes.

Livelihood diversity and dynamism in Timor-Leste; insights for coastal resource governance and livelihood development

Coastal communities within small island developing states are typically highly dependent on fisheries and other natural resource-based livelihoods. However, specialisation as a ‘fisher’ is rare compared to diverse livelihoods that can be adapted as opportunities and challenges emerge. Understanding this dynamic “livelihood landscape” is important for improving governance and livelihood opportunities associated with natural resources.

Community-based fisheries management approach adopted in Bangladesh

The Community Based Fisheries Management (CBFM) Project, funded by the Ford Foundation (1994-1999) and the UK Government’s Department for International Development (2002- 2006), aimed to promote the sustainable use of, and equitable distribution of benefits from, inland fisheries resources by empowering communities to manage their own resources. The project was implemented by the WorldFish and the Government of Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries (DoF) with the support of 11 NonGovernmental Organizations (NGOs).

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food-Systems (FISH) in Myanmar

Myanmar is a country with central lowlands including a mega delta, ringed by steep rugged highlands. As the second-most important food after rice, fish is an essential component of the diet in Myanmar, where per capita fish consumption is high at over 25 kg and the preference is for freshwater fish. Domestic fish demand is growing while there is a decline in capture fisheries.

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