Non-farmed fish contribute to greater micronutrient intakes than farmed fish: results from an intra-household survey in rural Bangladesh

Fish is the most important animal-source food (ASF) in Bangladesh, produced from capture fisheries (non-farmed) and aquaculture (farmed) sub-sectors. Large differences in micronutrient content of fish species from these sub-sectors exist. The aims of the present paper are to describe the importance of fish in the diets of vulnerable groups in comparison to other ASF, and the contribution of species from non-farmed and farmed sources to nutrient intakes.

Livelihood diversity and dynamism in Timor-Leste; insights for coastal resource governance and livelihood development

Coastal communities within small island developing states are typically highly dependent on fisheries and other natural resource-based livelihoods. However, specialisation as a ‘fisher’ is rare compared to diverse livelihoods that can be adapted as opportunities and challenges emerge. Understanding this dynamic “livelihood landscape” is important for improving governance and livelihood opportunities associated with natural resources.

Community-based fisheries management approach adopted in Bangladesh

The Community Based Fisheries Management (CBFM) Project, funded by the Ford Foundation (1994-1999) and the UK Government’s Department for International Development (2002- 2006), aimed to promote the sustainable use of, and equitable distribution of benefits from, inland fisheries resources by empowering communities to manage their own resources. The project was implemented by the WorldFish and the Government of Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries (DoF) with the support of 11 NonGovernmental Organizations (NGOs).

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food-Systems (FISH) in Myanmar

Myanmar is a country with central lowlands including a mega delta, ringed by steep rugged highlands. As the second-most important food after rice, fish is an essential component of the diet in Myanmar, where per capita fish consumption is high at over 25 kg and the preference is for freshwater fish. Domestic fish demand is growing while there is a decline in capture fisheries.

Aquaculture for income and nutrition : Final report

The United States Agency for International Development-Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (USAID-AIN) project, implemented by WorldFish, emphasized technology development for improved fish strains, and capacity building in hatcheries and nurseries for wider dissemination and uptake among small- and medium-scale household and commercial producers. Improving nutritional benefits from household aquaculture investment was also an important activity of the project.

Annual Report 2017

The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) is a new CRP that builds on earlier CRPs for Livestock and Fish (L&F) and Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) as well as prior research by WorldFish and the managing partners. Key outcomes from the two flagships of Sustainable Aquaculture and Sustaining Small-scale Fisheries during 2017, including milestones achieved, are summarized in this report.

Is resilience socially constructed? Empirical evidence from Fiji, Ghana, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam

The objective of this paper is to better understand the various individual and household factors that influence resilience, that is, people’s ability to respond adequately to shocks and stressors. One of our hypotheses is that resilience does not simply reflect the expected effects of quantifiable factors such as level of assets, or even less quantifiable social processes such as people’s experience, but is also determined by more subjective dimensions related to people’s perceptions of their ability to cope, adapt or transform in the face of adverse events.

Is community-based fisheries management realising multiple objectives? Examining evidence from the literature

Community-based and co-management approaches are key strategies for small-scale fisheries management. The expansion of these approaches is particularly apparent in the Pacific, where communities rely heavily on small-scale fisheries and concerns about sustainability are increasing. Many community-based management initiatives are recognised within a regional practitioner’s network referred to as the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) network.

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