Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART) in Assam, India, for sustainably increasing fish production and productivityThe Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for

The Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for implementation of the Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART). The Project Development Objective is to add value and improve the resilience of selected agriculture value chains, focusing on smallholder farmers and agro-entrepreneurs in targeted districts of Assam. Fish has been prioritized as one of the value chains for interventions under APART.

Socioeconomic characteristics of hilsa fishers in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar: Opportunities and challenges

The Darwin-Hilsa project is developing an incentivebased system of hilsa fisheries management in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwady Delta. This study uses a mixed-methods approach to assess the socioeconomic status of local fishing households. Many are extremely vulnerable, owing to the seasonal nature of fishing and unpredictable flows of income. Coping strategies include informal loans, livelihood diversification, and migration, while many flout fishing restrictions to cover costs and repay loans.

Spawning seasonality of hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) in Myanmar's Ayeyarwady Delta

The hilsa is a critically important species for smallscale fishing communities in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwady Delta and Rakhine State. Yet current fishing regulations are inadequate and exploitation rates are well beyond sustainable levels. This study analyses key parameters underlying hilsa biology, comparing them across different ecological zones of the hilsa’s range in Myanmar and across time. It provides evidence of major spawning activity between July and September in the freshwater zone, particularly in September.

Participatory rural appraisal: Vulnerability study of Ayeyarwady delta fishing communities in Myanmar and social protection opportunities

This study seeks to inform fisheries management and social protection processes of the key vulnerability issues faced by fishers at five pilot sites selected for fisheries co-management within the research programme of the Myanmar Department of Fisheries, WorldFish and FAO on an Centre for International Agricultural Research(ACIAR) funded project. The PRA-V study also explored gender vulnerability aspects, focusing on female-headed households and individual women from fisher households.

Why marginality persists in a governable fishery: the case of New Zealand

This paper examines reproduction of marginality evident in fisheries. Uneven relations are widespread across geography and scale; between distant water fishing nations and coastal developing countries; between fishers on large-scale trawlers and smaller boats; between local elites and peasant operators; and between boat owners and crews working in poor and slave-like conditions. With inequality and social exclusion being such a pervasive phenomenon, we ask why do these relationships persist?

Improving the livelihoods and wellbeing of women fish retailers: Success stories from the STREAMS project in Egypt

This booklet presents stories of women fish retailers in the governorates of Kafr El-Sheikh (Lower Egypt) and Fayoum (Upper Egypt). The livelihoods of these women retailers were supported by several market interventions implemented under the Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System (STREAMS) project. The project is funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and led by WorldFish through the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH), in cooperation with CARE International Egypt.

Productivity and coastal fisheries biomass yields of the northeast coastal waters of the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem

This paper describes the current marine fisheries situation in the northeast sector of the Bay of Bengal, ninety percent of which corresponds to Myanmar's EEZ and ten percent to Bangladesh. With the exception of the research carried out by the fisheries research vessel Fridtjof Nansen, the Myanmar sector is largely data deficient due to political reasons.

Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories

The large tuna resources of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are delivering great economic benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) through sale of licences to distant water fishing nations and employment in fish processing. However, tuna needs to contribute to Pacific Island societies in another important way—by increasing local access to the fish required for good nutrition to help combat the world’s highest levels of diabetes and obesity.

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