Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Indonesia

Indonesia is one of the top ten aquaculture-producing countries globally. The sector makes a significant contribution to the country’s development. Women are engaged in a range of aquaculture production and value chain activities in Indonesia. In particular, women are predominate in marketing and processing. Despite this, there is currently a lack of information regarding women’s roles – and more fundamentally – the outcomes for women and factors that enable or constrain these. This represents a critical gap in the knowledge needed for effective aquaculture programmes and policies.

Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a global leader in inland fish production and has been ranked as the fifth largest producer of aquaculture food fish in the world. The fisheries sector, including aquaculture, provides employment to 17.8 million people, out of which women constitute 1.4 million. The shrimp industry alone employs over one million people in its processing factories, out of which 88.64 percent are women. While women play a significant role in aquaculture production in Bangladesh, their contributions remain under-reported.

When is a fisher (not) a fisher? Factors that influence the decision to report fishing as an occupation in rural Cambodia

In the developing world, the majority of people who fish in inland areas do so primarily for subsistence needs. This suggests that survey or census questionnaires which collect information concerning the occupations of respondents will underreport the number of people who fish, and corollary to this, misrepresent dependence on fishing as a support service for food and supplemental income.

Social considerations of large river sanctuaries: A case study from the hilsa shad fishery in Bangladesh

The establishment of a sanctuary is often suggested as an effective strategy for ecological restoration, though social aspects of such attempts are often overlooked. This study analyzed the socioeconomic status of 248 fishing households who are dependent on hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) sanctuaries in southern Bangladesh.

Reimagining large-scale open-water fisheries governance through adaptive comanagement in hilsa shad sanctuaries

Almost a half million fishers in Bangladesh are predominantly reliant on the hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) fishery in the Meghna River and estuarine ecosystem. This paper adopts a broadened concept of social-ecological traps to frame the complex dynamics that emerge from social and ecological interactions in this highly natural resource-dependent social-ecological system (SES). We analyze how endogenous self-reinforcing processes in the system and poor initial conditions, particularly debt and lack of livelihood options outside fisheries, keep fishing households in poverty.

Productivity and coastal fisheries biomass yields of the northeast coastal waters of the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem

This paper describes the current marine fisheries situation in the northeast sector of the Bay of Bengal, ninety percent of which corresponds to Myanmar's EEZ and ten percent to Bangladesh. With the exception of the research carried out by the fisheries research vessel Fridtjof Nansen, the Myanmar sector is largely data deficient due to political reasons.

Operationalising access to oceanic fisheries resources by small-scale fishers to improve food security in the Pacific Islands

Maintaining the level of fish consumption in Pacific Island countries recommended for good nutrition as the populations of coastal communities grow, and as coral reefs are degraded by global warming and ocean acidification, will depend on small-scale fishers catching more tuna and other large pelagic fish. Concerted research and development by regional agencies shows that nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) provide one way for small-scale fishers to make this transition.

Labour, identity and wellbeing in Bangladesh’s dried fish value chains

Dried fish products play an important role in the diets of fish consumers and in the livelihoods of actors in fisheries value chains throughout Africa and Asia. In Bangladesh, a large proportion of marine and freshwater fish landings are processed by drying. The scale and significance of dried fish production, trade and consumption is rarely acknowledged and poorly understood, however, in part because of a tendency for fisheries research to focus on fishers, thereby overlooking actors and processes in mid- and downstream value chain segments.

Integration of mapping and socio-economic status of cage culture: Towards balancing lake-use and culture fisheries in Lake Victoria, Kenya

The present study aimed to map the presence of cages and to profile the socio-economic characteristics of their owners in Lake Victoria Basin Kenya as baseline information to aid in the formation of policies to manage the integration of capture and culture fisheries.

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