Small-scale fisheries of San Miguel Bay, Philippines: social aspects of production and marketing.

To examine the possibility of incorporating fishing communities into the Bicol River Basin Development Program, five studies were conducted in the San Miguel Bay area. Data were gathered from interviews with 641 fishing households and were supplemented by observing participants over a 2-year period. The first three studies analyze, respectively, the socioeconomic characteristics of fishing communities; the seasonality of fishing, processing, and marketing; and the economic role of women and children.

Why do fishers fish where they fish? Using the ideal free distribution to understand the behaviour of artisanal reef fishers

We used the theory of the ideal free distribution (IFD) as a framework to understand the mechanisms underlying fishing site selection by Anguillian artisanal fishers exploiting shallow-water coral reefs. Contrary to the predictions of IFD, fishers did not distribute themselves so that average reward was equal among fishers using different fishing methods or among fishers using the same method. In addition, fishing pressure did not increase with resource availability. Key assumptions of the IFD were not met.

Corals, fishermen and tourists

Two major anthropogenic activities that disturb coral reefs are fishing and tourism, even though coral reefs are important for both fishing and tourism. Already more than 60 per cent of all reefs worldwide are endangered. The use of explosives and poison by small-scale fishers, to supply the market for live fish for aquariums and for human consumption, cause irreversible damages to reefs. Similarly, rapid and unmanaged coastal development for marine tourism negatively affects coral reefs in many ways.

Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Indonesia

Indonesia is one of the top ten aquaculture-producing countries globally. The sector makes a significant contribution to the country’s development. Women are engaged in a range of aquaculture production and value chain activities in Indonesia. In particular, women are predominate in marketing and processing. Despite this, there is currently a lack of information regarding women’s roles – and more fundamentally – the outcomes for women and factors that enable or constrain these. This represents a critical gap in the knowledge needed for effective aquaculture programmes and policies.

Labour, identity and wellbeing in Bangladesh’s dried fish value chains

Dried fish products play an important role in the diets of fish consumers and in the livelihoods of actors in fisheries value chains throughout Africa and Asia. In Bangladesh, a large proportion of marine and freshwater fish landings are processed by drying. The scale and significance of dried fish production, trade and consumption is rarely acknowledged and poorly understood, however, in part because of a tendency for fisheries research to focus on fishers, thereby overlooking actors and processes in mid- and downstream value chain segments.

Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a global leader in inland fish production and has been ranked as the fifth largest producer of aquaculture food fish in the world. The fisheries sector, including aquaculture, provides employment to 17.8 million people, out of which women constitute 1.4 million. The shrimp industry alone employs over one million people in its processing factories, out of which 88.64 percent are women. While women play a significant role in aquaculture production in Bangladesh, their contributions remain under-reported.

Operationalising access to oceanic fisheries resources by small-scale fishers to improve food security in the Pacific Islands

Maintaining the level of fish consumption in Pacific Island countries recommended for good nutrition as the populations of coastal communities grow, and as coral reefs are degraded by global warming and ocean acidification, will depend on small-scale fishers catching more tuna and other large pelagic fish. Concerted research and development by regional agencies shows that nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) provide one way for small-scale fishers to make this transition.

Farmers' guidebook on pond fish culture (in Bangla)

This guidebook details the technical steps to culturing fish in homestead ponds in Bangladesh. It is targeted at hilsa fishers in rural Bangladesh, who often have ponds where they can culture fish and fulfil their livelihood needs yet have insufficient knowledge about fish culture. The aim of the guidebook is to support fishers to develop an alternate income source and help them cope with the seasonal ban on hilsa fishing imposed by the government.

Distribution of economic returns in small-scale fisheries for international markets: A value-chain analysis

Small-scale fishers are often believed to receive marginal earnings for seafood relative to other value- chain actors but proportionate incomes across different traded species are rarely compared. This study compares value chains for 15 species of sea cucumbers between Fiji and Kiribati using data collected on sale prices of dried products (bêche-de-mer) from fishers to middlemen and exporters, export prices and market retail prices in China.

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