Operationalising access to oceanic fisheries resources by small-scale fishers to improve food security in the Pacific Islands

Maintaining the level of fish consumption in Pacific Island countries recommended for good nutrition as the populations of coastal communities grow, and as coral reefs are degraded by global warming and ocean acidification, will depend on small-scale fishers catching more tuna and other large pelagic fish. Concerted research and development by regional agencies shows that nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) provide one way for small-scale fishers to make this transition.

Farmers' guidebook on pond fish culture (in Bangla)

This guidebook details the technical steps to culturing fish in homestead ponds in Bangladesh. It is targeted at hilsa fishers in rural Bangladesh, who often have ponds where they can culture fish and fulfil their livelihood needs yet have insufficient knowledge about fish culture. The aim of the guidebook is to support fishers to develop an alternate income source and help them cope with the seasonal ban on hilsa fishing imposed by the government.

Distribution of economic returns in small-scale fisheries for international markets: A value-chain analysis

Small-scale fishers are often believed to receive marginal earnings for seafood relative to other value- chain actors but proportionate incomes across different traded species are rarely compared. This study compares value chains for 15 species of sea cucumbers between Fiji and Kiribati using data collected on sale prices of dried products (bêche-de-mer) from fishers to middlemen and exporters, export prices and market retail prices in China.

Livelihood diversification in coastal and inland fishing communities: misconceptions, evidence and implications for fisheries management

The paper starts with a review of the concept of diversification, encompassing its associated dimensions, typology and influencing factors. Linkages between diversification and poverty are also briefly outlined in this section. The case of diversification in fishing communities is made in the third part of the paper, exploring misconceptions in greater depth, providing case study evidence to dispel them and highlighting consequences of inappropriately designed and targeted policies on fisherfolks.

Socioeconomic characteristics of payang seine (lampara) and driftnet fisheries in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

A proportionate random sample survey of 10 percent of the driftnet and Payang seine fishers in West Sumatra was carried out in 1998. A total of 45 driftnet and 66 lampara fishers were interviewed to obtain socioeconomic data on the fisheries. About 40 percent of the driftnet and 76 percent of the lampara fishers owned and operated their fishing vessels and gears indicating a high level of ownership of fishing assets by these small scale fishers.

Conserving hilsa and building livelihoods in Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, many poor fishers struggle to cope during the government-imposed hilsa fishing ban. Boosting the resilience of the communities whose livelihoods depend on hilsa (also known as ilish), the national fish of Bangladesh, is therefore the goal of the USAID-funded Enhanced Coastal Fisheries in Bangladesh (ECOFISH Bangladesh) project. Since 2014, the project has established 280 hilsa conservation groups in 81 villages, and is training women in new livelihood activities such as vegetable gardening.

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