Women’s engagement in and outcomes from small-scale fisheries value chains in Malawi: effects of social relations

Women play an important role within small-scale fishing communities in sub-Saharan Africa through engaging in fish value chain activities and contributing to household food security and income. There is, however, little empirical information about the nature of women’s engagement in small-scale fishery value chains and the outcomes of that engagement especially in Malawi, our study country.

Employment generation in the Egyptian aquaculture value chain: implications for meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Egypt faces multiple interlinked challenges such as unemployment, poverty and gender inequality that pose tremendous barriers in the current efforts to achieve sustainable development. Aquaculture is a primary sector of the economy that has high potential to not only for provide nutritious food, but also to contribute to the national economy. The aquaculture value chain provides substantial employment generation opportunities, including for females and the youth.

Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART) in Assam, India, for sustainably increasing fish production and productivityThe Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for

The Government of Assam through the Government of India has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for implementation of the Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART). The Project Development Objective is to add value and improve the resilience of selected agriculture value chains, focusing on smallholder farmers and agro-entrepreneurs in targeted districts of Assam. Fish has been prioritized as one of the value chains for interventions under APART.

Fish trait preferences: a review of existing knowledge and implications for breeding programmes

Continued growth of the aquaculture sector will rely on the availability of fish with traits that respond to the needs and preferences of these users along the value chain. Such trait responsiveness requires that fish breeding programmes have reliable knowledge of these users’ trait preferences. The present study found from a non-systematic literature review, that no fish breeding programme had reported user preference in their product-profile design.

The Aquaculture: Increasing income, diversifying diets and empowering women in Bangladesh and Nigeria

The Aquaculture: Increasing Income, diversifying diets and empowering women in Bangladesh and Nigeria project aims to enhance the incomes, diets and nutrition of smallholder families. The project embeds proven technologies in Bangladesh by harnessing public and private sector products and services to increase the productivity of smallholder aquaculture systems and conducts research in Nigeria on the role and potential of aquaculture to achieve national development goals and fill critical knowledge gaps. 

The project is particularly important from a nutrition-sensitive perspective, as increasing women’s empowerment through the production of fish, a highly nutritious animal-source food, is a key pathway through which the nutrition of women, as well as their family members, will improve.

WorldFish has a project running in the north-west of Bangladesh, in Rangpur and Rajshahi Divisions and in Nigeria using aquaculture to increase income, diversify diets and empower women. The project in Bangladesh builds on earlier work undertaken by WorldFish in different parts of the country. In includes engaging with local service providers and other private sector organizations in the value chain to introduce knowledge and technologies to impact on carp poly-culture. One of the project’s goals is to increase productivity and diversity of fish production systems, including the production of micronutrient-rich small local fish.

In Nigeria WorldFish is engaged in a project using aquaculture to increase income, diversify diets and empower women. In the first 18 months, a national scoping study is being completed to better understand the role of fish, in particular aquaculture, in Nigeria. Once this study is completed there will be more clarity on just how aquaculture can assist in improving smallholder incomes, increasing dietary diversity, improving nutrition and empowering women through engagement in the fish value chain. This work will lead to an improved understanding of fish supply and demand, market trends, value chains, aquaculture systems and the role of fish in diets and nutrition in Nigeria. Once this information is analyzed, it will help WorldFish, Government agencies, the private sector, and potential donors find appropriate entry points for future investment in aquaculture to achieve long-term goals and objectives.

The project partners closely with local and national governments, non-governmental organizations, local service providers, the private sector and development agencies.

Opportunities and challenges for small-scale aquaculture in Zambia

This study, funded by the German government and in partnership with an international research institute as well as the government department responsible for fish farming in Zambia, collected quantitative and qualitative data that aimed to provide a holistic view of the livelihoods of smallholder fish farmers in the country. A total of 151 fish farming households were surveyed and an additional 46 qualitative interviews were collected with a selected variety of fish farmers.

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